(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Alpha"

I 



* C X 



' -'"-^ 






^^ v&* 



ALPHA 

1933 

PUBLISHED BY THE 

STUDENTS 

OF THE 

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

BRIDGEWATER • MASSACHUSETTS 



VOLUME NO. 
XXXV 



C. A. HACK & SON, INC., TAUNTON', MASS. 



IN MEMORY 

ARTHUR CLARKE BOYDEN 

" not to be ministered 

unto, but to minister " 



Whose kindly spirit, clarity of thought, 
and forceful ness of character have 
so guided Bridgewater's prog- 
ress through the years. 




DR. ARTHUR CLARKE BOYDEN 



Principal of the State Normal School at Bridgewater 
1906—1932 

President of the State Teachers College at Bridgewater 
April 2, 1932— March 15, 1933 



A Tribute 



Those who have had the privilege of being associated 
with Arthur Clarke Boyden have been influenced by his sim- 
plicity of character, his nobleness of spirit, and his breadth 
of vision. 

He was a leader among leaders in the field of education 
and one to whom many came for inspiration and guidance. 
He kept abreast of the progressive movements of the time, 
taking from them the finer and more cultural values, not 
allowing the superficial and fleeting to turn him from his 
professional ideals. Never self-seeking or working for his 
own interests, he received the many honors which came to 
him, modestly and unaffectedly, shunning publicity. 

He was a real teacher, having the power to interpret life 
in all its complexities with a philosophy which was perpet- 
ually young. 

He was a lover of children. An invitation from them 
brought a ready and warm response from him, and no occas- 
ion of theirs was too simple for him to attend. His presence 
and appreciative understanding made it a noteworthy event 
in their eyes. 

He was a public spirited citizen who was honored and 
beloved by his fellow townspeople and depended upon for 
wise counsel and saneness of judgment. 

He was devoted to his home and family circle in which 
he enjoyed a rare and beautiful companionship with our 
beloved Mrs. Boyden. 

He opened for us all many pathways to knowledge and 
by the uplifting influence of his spiritual nature and virtuous 
example gave us the vision of the more abundant life. 

THE FACULTY 




MISS JANE BENNETT 
Teacher of Grade Five from 1898 to 1932 

Of historic lineage, a dynamic force 
in high living and worthy citizenship. 

"Wit, now and then, struck smartly, throws a spark." 




MISS NELLIE MABEL BENNETT 
Teacher of Grade Six from 1896 to 1932 

Much-loved teacher of boys and girls to whom she "opened 
doors to roomy corridors" through her love of the beautiful. 




3rd row— G. ALLEN, I. GRAVES, M. SMITH, C. VINING, N, LOCKWOOD, G. SMITH, P. NYE, E. POPE, M, MARKS, 

L. BRALEY, K. PACKARD, E. BRADFORD, R. DAVIS, K. HILL. 
2nd row— G. DURGIN, H. SLEEPER, M. WARNER, G. ROGERS, C. DONER, J. ARNOLD, G. REYNOLDS, A. BEAL, 

L. BORCHERS, A. TAYLOR. J. KELLY, P. HUFFINGTON, L.STEARNS. 
1st row— L. DECKER, A. MOFFITT, J. CARTER, F. BECKWITH, B. HUNT, M. BURNELL, DR. BOYDEN, H. SHAW, 

F. RAND, O. LOVETT. 



FACULTY 



Arthur C. Boyden, A. B., A. M., L. H. D., Ed. D., President; History and Prin- 
ciples of Education. 

Joseph I. Arnold, A. B., A. M., History, Sociology, Economics. 

Frank Crosier, Physical Education. 

Charles E. Doner, Penmanship. 

George H. Durgin, A. B., Ed. M., Mathematics; Science. 

Paul V. Huffington, B. S. in Ed., A. M., Geography. 

Brenelle Hunt, Psychology and School Administration. 

John J. Kelly, Dean of Men; Practical Arts. 

Gordon L. Reynolds, B. S. in Ed., Drawing. 

Harlan P. Shaw, Physiography and Science. 

Louis C. Stearns, Greenhouse and School Gardens; Civic Biology. 

Alice B. Beal, B. S. in Ed., Supervision of Observation and Practice Teaching; General 
Methods. 



Frill G. Beckwith, Handicrafts. 

Edith H. Bradford, A. B., French. 

Mary Isabel Caldwell, B. S. in Ed., Physical Education. 

Julia C. Carter, A. B., Supervision of Librarian Course; Librarian. 

Ruth E. Davis, B. S. in Ed., A. M., English Expression; Literature; Methods. 

Lois L. Decker, A. B., A. M., Supervisor of Physical Education. 

E. Irene Graves, A. B., A. M., Biology; Nature Study. 

M. Katherine Hill, B. L. I., Literature. 

Olive H. Lovett, A. B., Ed. M., English Expression. 

Iva V. Lutz, B. S. in Ed., Elementary Methods and Practice. 

L. Adelaide Moffitt, Reading; Dramatics. 

Priscilla M. Nye, Drawing. 

E. Elizabeth Pope, B. S. in Ed., A. M., Dean of Women; Professional Ethics. 

Frieda Rand, A. B., Supervisor of Music. 

Mary V. Smith, B. S. in Ed., Ed. M., History and Social Science. 

Cora M. Viving, B. S. in Ed., Library Assistant. 

THE TRAINING SCHOOL 

Martha M. Burnell, Principal Gertrude M. Rogers, Grade II 

Gladys L. Allen, Grade II Helen E. Sleeper, Grade IV 

Louise H. Borchers, B. S. in Ed., Grade V Grace E. Smith, Grade I 

Lucy B. Braley, Grade III Flora M. Stuart, Grade I 

Neva I. Lockwood, B. S. in Ed., Grade VI Alice M. Taylor, B. S. in Ed., Grade IV 

Mary L. Marks, Kindergarten Charlotte M. Thompson, B. S. in Ed., 
Katherine Packard, B. S. in Ed., Grade IV Grade III 

A. Mabelle Warner, Grade V 




MISS MARY A. PREVOST 

Supervisor of Drawing from 1916 to 1932. 

"Service gently given with unassuming graciousness." 

Her appreciation of beauty as a practical asset to everyday life was 

responsible for the wideness of her unruffled charm ; a charm 

never too fragile to comprehend the subtlest humor. 



CLASSES 3 




1933 ALPHA 



1 4IM 


*^ 1 iLMIOkb \£ 




1 IIP""'"" 


1 


_ NhJJI' M^> s'^ZZZ^ J~ ~^m 





President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Clifford Johnson 

Ruth Glidden 

Louise Hewitt 

Marie Sarson 



Senior History 



September 1929 .... Freshmen — laden with Wright and Ditson boxes; shivering 
in angel robes, struggling with locker combinations. 

Naively gay. 

September 1930 .... Sophomores — crossing the quadrangle loaded with couch 
covers and lampshades; strutting, gesticulating, modulating. 

Dramatically cynical. 

September 1931 .... Juniors — burdened with committees; equipping, scoring, 
banqueting. 

Briskly efficient. 

September 1932 .... Seniors — staggering under the weight of the Variorum Shakes- 
peare; clogging; posing; promming. 

Calmly poised. 

All these have the class of '33 survived. And more, it has lived experiences uniquely 
its own. 

Bridgewater's first Junior Prom shone in its star-spangled blueness for the class of '33. 

During the seniority of the class came the "change the name" fever. Ably its members 
supervised the transition from "Normal Offering" to "Alpha", the new yearbook cover 
design, the creation of the new seal. 

At Christmas, in accordance with custom, the class sold cards; but its members flavored 
custom with a dash of differentness. They created and sold original, hand-blocked cards 
of modern design. 

On Class Day the seniors again fused differentness with tradition. Like their pre- 
decessors they presented tableaux; unlike them they designed their own sets. 

The Class of '33 was the first to meet the question of cap and gown versus the velvet 
drape as atmosphere for the year book pictures. 

And on the night of June 9th, from 9 until 2, Senior Prom. 



14 



CLASSES 



MARY ELIZABETH ALLEN 

Cottage Street, Marion. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Head of Track and Field 3, President 4. Hockey 
1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 4. Baseball 2, 3. Glee 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

"Such let me seem 'til such I be." 

When you're trying to locate a startling giggle sometimes 
heard in A classes, look for that golden landmark, Mary's 
head. But be not surprised to find that the originator of 
such mirth is equally at home on the hockey field, on the 
basketball court, or within the sacred portals of the gym at 
"social" time — and always as the leader of a group. 





MACCABEAH ARENBERG 

Rochester. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Hockey 2. Gar- 
den Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-Pres. 3. Hobby Club 
3, 4. Kindergarten-Primary Club 3. 

"She opens her mouth with wisdom; and the 
law of kindness is on her tongue." 

Among Maccabeah's calm enthusiasms is a joy in growing 
things. Her closeness to the earth has given her a homely 
sweetness which shyness and modesty have kept from most 
people. But those who know her well find in her a true friend. 



FLORENCE GENEVA BAKER 

17 Elm Street, Brookline. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. 
Garden Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Class Representative 4. 
Student Council 4. 

"It is a friendly heart that has plenty of friends." 

A big smile — a little person — a big heart — a little serious- 
ness — a big reserve of ingenuity — a little dash of spicy wit. 
Who? Florence. 




15 



1933 ALPHA 




LEOCADIA THERESE BARANOWSKI 

38 Briggs Street, Easthampton. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4, Soccer 3, Volley Ball 3, 4. Hobby Club 
3, 4. Garden Club 2, 3, 4, Pres. 4. Camera Club 3. 

"More things are wrought in prayer than this 
world dreams of" — 

Could anyone find a more devout, serious-minded girl than 
"Leo"? Could anyone find a person of franker opinion than 
she? Could anyone find a more ready partner in jokes and 
laughter? In such varying moods do we know Leo. 



HELEN MADELINE BARKER 

84 North Main Street, Leominster. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4, Baseball 1, 2, Hockey 1, Bowling 1, 2, 
3, 4, Soccer 2. Camera Club 3, 4, Hobby 
Club 3. Scouts 1, 2, 3, 4. Kindergarten-Primary 
Club 3, 4. 

"Say not that she did well or ill 
Only, 'She did her best'." 

Helen is a tall, slender, and fair-haired, which doesn't 
mean that she is languid. On the contrary her most out- 
standing characteristic is industriousness. Helen plays and 
works with enthusiasm. Would that we were imbued with 
her spirit of helpfulness! 





AGNES VERONICA BARRY 

327 Cedar Street, New Bedford. W. A. A. 4. 

"Hail to thee, blythe spirit." 

Beneath her quiet exterior, Agnes conceals a spirit of fun, 
and is it a devil-may-care air? As it is her first year at Bridge- 
water, after attending Fitchburg, we have not become as well 
acquainted with her as we wished. That constant twinkle 
in her eye impresses even the inastute observer. 



16 



CLASSES 



CLARECE DUNHAM BELL 

Main Street, Wellfleet. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. Scouts 
1, 2. Hobby Club 3, 4. 

"She can bake a cake and sweep the floor, 

Yet knows the sky is endless and more than 
mountain high." 

Clarece is a lover of nature in all its forms, with the ability 
to give alluring descriptions of beautiful and interesting spots 
she has seen. 

Her quiet manner is the only outward indication of many 
inner resources. These are evident in her clever poems and 
varied interests. Geographically, her interest is in the South; 
artistically, it is music; practically, it is domestic science; 
and actively, her interest is the water sports of Cape Cod. 





EVELYN LOUISE BISCOE 

Washington Street, East Norton. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4, W. A. A. Board 3, Head of Hikes 3. 
Bowling 1, 2, 3, 4, Head of Bowling 3. Basket- 
ball 1, 2. Dancing 1. Garden Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
President 3. Dormitory Council 4, Vice-Pres. 
Woodward Hall 4. Social Activities Comm. 4. 

"Charm strikes the eye, and merit wins the soul." 

A distinct appearance of self-possession covers much of 
the excitable person beneath that is Evelyn. Broad-minded- 
ness prevents her from indulging in lengthy arguments. What 
a charming combination in a friend — a serenity that is the 
source of much comfort, and an insight that enables her to 
understand one's weaknesses. Small wonder at her popularity! 



MARY JOSEPHINE BOLAND 

4 Hamilton Street, Brockton. W. A. A. 1, 2, 
3, 4, Hockey 1, 2. Basketball 1, 2, 4. Baseball 
1, 4. Topics of the Day Club 3. Class Day 
Committee 4. 

"Fight then with shafts of silver and o'ercome 
When no force else can get the masterdom." 

Although the themes of most popular songs are frequently 
based upon fancy and fallacy, those which have made the 
name of "Mary" synonymous with "friends" and "pal", 
are true in the case of our Mary. Her hands, an index of 
character, aid us in our conception of Mary. Graceful and 
lovely, yet withal capable and proficient, they perform won- 
ders with "Soennecken" and "Steinway". Did you wonder 
about the success of Day Student Socials? Here's the secret — 
Mary's hands and heart are the power behind the throne. 




17 



1933 ALPHA 




DOROTHY ALICE BOOTH 

19 Willard Street, New Bedford. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 4. Dancing 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Hobby Club 3, 4. Soccer 3. Kindergarten- 
Primary Club 4. 

"It takes so little to make us glad, 
Just the cheering clasp of a friendly hand, 
Just a word from one who can understand." 

A genial good humor, a smiling countenance, and a ready 
wit, combined with real ability and the faculty of adopting 
a serious manner when the occasion demands, and we have 
enumerated "Dot's" chief characteristics. 



RUBY ELAINE BRETTELL 

160 First Street, Melrose. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 4. Bowling 
2, 4. Dancing 1, 2. Baseball 1, 2. French 
Club 1, 2, 3. Garden Club 1, 2. Pro and Con 2. 
Topics of the Day 4. Hobby Club 4. 

"Why worry what to-morrow brings?" 

Ruby, the calm, cool and collected, is intelligent and clear- 
thinking. Knowledge enables her to be alone but not lonely. 
Her favorite literature deals with places like Patagonia, 
Timbuctoo, and Wrangel Island. 





HARRIET BURRILL 

99 Fremont Street, Bridgewater. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4. Bowling 2, 4. Glee Club 3, 4. 

"The way the children love her." 

Harriet is a girl of the athletic type, fond of activities, 
enthusiastic, and happy-hearted. Her favorite hobby is 
playing the piano, merely another evidence of that versatility 
which has won her so many friends from the kindergarten 
age to the gray-haired. 



18 



CLASSES 



MARY AGNES CARROLL 

55 High Street, Bridge-water. W. A. A. 2, 3, 4. 
Hockey 2, 3, 4. Basketball 2, 4. Baseball 2, 3, 4. 
Track 3. Class representative 1, 2. Day Stu- 
dent Council 1, 2, Sec.-Treas. 2. Student Co- 
operative Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Treas. 3, 4. Lib- 
rary Club 3, 4. Hobby Club 4. Camera Club 
4. Campus Comment 2, 3. 

"True worth is being, not seeming 
In doing each day that goes by 
Some little good, not in dreaming 
Of great things to do by and by." 

Mary must have learned the secret of adding extra hours 
to a day for she accomplishes so much. Efficiency is her 
watchword. Perhaps some day, Mary will be one of the 
"World's Famous" — photographers, for her secret delight 
is developing and printing pictures. 




MARJORIE CASE 

B. S., Jackson College. 

140 South Street, Bridgewater, Mass. 

"Smooth runs the water where the brook runs 
deep." 

To Marjorie and "Representative" Durgin, Bridgewater 
owes much of the success of that stupendous dramatic pro- 
duction, "Uncle Henry's Wedding." Bridgewater will al- 
ways remember Marjorie for her part in this play, but Al 
will always remember her for her intensive interest in gym 
class. 



PAMELA HARTLEY CHACE 

14 Parker Street, New Bedford. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4. Hockey 1. Baseball 1. Soccer 3. 
Hobby Club 3, 4. Garden Club 2, 3. Campus 
Comment 2, 3. Exchange Editor 3. 

"She was a scholar and a ripe and good one, 
Exceeding wise, fair spoken, and persuading." 

Pam has a quaint unassuming nature, but underneath it 
all is a deep spirit of adventure. The word "unusual" de- 
scribes her best. Not only is her classwork unusual, but so 
is everything else she does. Her sense of humor, her funny 
escapades, her sunny disposition, and her complex character 
make her — Pamela. 




11) 



1933 ALPHA 




EVELYN CATHERINE CHASSE 

Turnpike, South Easton. W. A. A. 1, 2. Cam- 
pus Comment 3, 4. Dancing 3, 4. Secretary- 
Treasurer of Day Student Council 4. Poster 
Committee 4. Class Day Chairman 4. 

"Deep-sighted in intelligence, 
Ideas, atoms, influence." 

Evelyn deserted the ranks of the commuters this year to 
get a taste of dormitory life. Perhaps this change was made 
so that she might devote even more of her time to Campus 
Comment and Class Day exercises. Evelyn's position on 
the poster committee is only one evidence of her interest 
in art which has been a prevailing influence in her four years 
at Bridgewater. 



DOROTHY CATHERINE 
CHATTERTON 

546 Walnut Street, Lynn. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 
Hockey 1, 2, 3, Basketball 1, 2, 3. Dramatic 
Club 4, Vice-Pres. 4. Social Activities Comm. 2. 

"None name her but to praise 
None know her but to love — " 

It is not easy to explain those things which make "Chat" 
the best there is. Dramatics and dancing find favor in her 
eyes. A lucky mortal, she can think of nothing she dislikes 
terribly. 





MARION BURNHAM COLLINS 

80 Middle Street, Gloucester. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 
4, Basketball 2. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Choir 2. 
Garden Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3. Treas. of 
Woodward 4. Dormitory Council 3, 4. 

"With such a comrade, such a friend 
I fain would walk 'til journey's end." 

Marion possesses all those fortunate qualities that earn 
her a niche everywhere. Her laugh is in a delightful class by 
itself, a giggle and a chuckle crinkling into charming laughter. 



20 



CLASSES 



ALICE DICK 

Main Street, West Warren. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 
Secretary 3. Pro and Con 1, 2. 

"A keen wit, a wise look, and an answer always 
ready." 

A pleasant smile and a gay greeting often hide Dickie's 
business-like thoughts. Alice can be counted as one of the 
fun makers of any situation; and yet she can be depended 
upon for direct and efficient thinking, too, when necessary. 

Carefree and happy — thoughtful and serious — such a 
paradoxical combination! 





PAULINE CECILIA DONOVAN 

27 Phillips Avenue, Stoughton. Campus Com- 
ment 1, 2. Normal Offering 1, 4. Hockey 1, 4. 

"In music her expression lies 
Her thoughts she can reveal." 

We need only study Pauline's poetry to realize that we 
have understood her true nature. 



CATHERINE LOUISE DOYLE 



933 Robeson Street, Fall River. 
Topics of the Day Club 3. 



W. A. A. 3. 



"Love, live, laugh and be merry." 

Kay's return to B. T. C. for her fourth year has certainly 
added more joy to our hearts and brought more interesting 
discussions to our Lit. classes. Her wide reading experience 
doubtless explains the animated conversation which makes 
her so valuable a member of hospitality committees. 



21 



1933 ALPHA 




VERDA FLORENCE DUNN 

Irving Street, Hingham. Dormitory Council 
1, 2, 4. Sec.-Treas. of Normal Hall 2. Campus 
Comment 2, 3. Normal Offering 3, 4, Asst. Editor 
4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Library Club 2, 3, 4, 
Pres. 4. Choir 1, 2, 3, 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4= 

"She walks in beauty." 

Verda's loveliness wears well, because it is not a veneer; 
but kindness in her heart, a lantern of service in her hand, 
laughter on her lips. 



MARY ELIZABETH DYER 

21 Sheridan Street, Taunton. W. A. A. 1, 2, 4. 
Normal Offering 1, 4. Day Student Council 1. 
Hobby Club 3. 

"It's nice to be natural, 
When it's natural to be nice." 

Perfection of achievement is what Mary strives for and 
what she usually succeeds in getting. But don't mistake us, 
she is not one of those tiresome individuals who are "always 
right." Ability, plus the faculty of not putting it "on ex- 
hibition", is the secret of Mary's naturalness. 





DOROTHY ELLEN FISH 

43 Houston Avenue, Milton. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. 
Baseball 1, Bowling 2, Soccer 3. 

"With the merriest twinkle in her eye 
And the gentlest manner in her heart." 

A great lover of the out-of-doors is Dot as is shown by her 
four years' activities. Whether it be on the field or in the 
classroom, hers is the sporting attitude — playing for the love 
of playing, working for the love of working. 

Her twinkling eyes invite one to know her, and her kindly 
manner compels one to love her. Hers is the well-rounded 
personality which calls for and demands a host of friends. 



22 



CLASSES 



BEATRICE VINTON FITTS 

64 Bigelow Street, Quincy. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Choir 1, 2, 3, 4. Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4. Director 3, 
Sec. 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. Scouts 1, 2, 3. Culture 
Fund Committee 1, 2. Topics of the Day Club 
3. Normal Offering Board 4. 

"Through worlds and races and terms and times, 
Saw musical order and pairing rhymes." 

Beatrice has always reminded us of one of two things: the 
bass viol, or her artistic ability as shown in the decorations 
of the Junior social. Because of her experience in the field 
of music, we expect to find Bea waving her baton somewhere 
in Quincy or thereabouts. 





DORIS BLACKSTONE CLIDDEN 

4 Farm Street, South Weymouth. Day Stu- 
dent Council 3. 

"A great deal of talent is lost in this 
world for the want of a little courage." 

An ardent worker in church organizations, a movie addict, 
and an industrious stamp collector are all representative of 
the many-sided Doris. You didn't believe it, did you? Just 
one more proof that appearances are often deceiving, for 
quiet girls are not always unresponsive, and unassuming 
classmates are seldom inactive. 



RUTH VERNA GLIDDEN 

Plymouth Street, North Middleboro. Student 
Council 1, 2, 3, 4. Class Rep. 1, 2, 3, 4. Vice- 
Pres. of class 1, 2, 3, 4. 

"She walks in beauty, like the night 
Of cloudless climes and starry skies." 

Ruth's name spells "A-R-T" to our minds. All her achieve- 
ments are colored by her vivid and joyous personality and 
her appreciative artistry. Decoration committees, posters, 
school seals, Christmas cards — all have felt the influence of 
her brush. 



23 




1933 ALPHA 




RUTH MADELINE GREGORY 

Royalston Road, North Winchendon. Glee 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Soccer 3. 
Scouts 1. Choir 1, 2, 3, 4. 

"Whose armor is her honest thought, 
And simple truth her utmost skill." 

The problems of life hold no terror or even worry for our 
Greg. Unperturbed and blithesome, she goes her way leaving 
the cares and troubles to the rest of us mortals. If time lags 
and you would be entertained, just look for Greg and she will 
hold you enthralled with a scintillating review of current 
events. 



ANNE GUTMAN 

74 Conant Street, Beverly. W. A. A. 4. Topics- 
of-the-Day Club 4. Orchestra 4. 

"Firm to resolve, 
Patient to perform." 

Anne was a newcomer to Bridgewater this year, but it 
did not take her long to become one of us. She is a welcome 
addition in the classroom as those of us in History and "Soc" 
will testify. And how could anyone who has seen her on the 
soccer field forget the way she can follow that ball! We've 
certainly enjoyed your brief stay, Anne, but wish you had 
come sooner. 





MARION ETHEL HANRAHAN 

1929 Beacon Street, Brighton. W. A. A. 1, 2, 
3, 4. Scouts 1, 2. Hobby Club 3, 4. 

"Scotch grit and Irish wit." 

Marion is a girl with a purpose. We all admire her for 
overcoming obstacles, keeping that sense of humor busy, and 
keeping on toward that same goal — to teach the blind. Her 
hobbies are manifold — from collecting pennies to collecting 
plants. Her talents are many; so also are her friends. 



24 



CLASSES 



MARJORIE VIOLET HARRINGTON 

119 Washington Street, Stoughton. Garden 
Club 2, 3, 4. Library Club 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. 
Topics of the Day Club 4. 

"To be sincere. To look life in the face, 
With calm, undrooping eyes." 

Marjorie has that faculty we all admire of accomplishing 
miracles at short notice. Big business executives have noth- 
ing on Marjorie when she gets going. It would be hard to 
find a keener mind and a more likable personality in one girl. 





HILDA HELEN HEIKKILA 

Centre Street, Quincy. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Bowling 4. Orchestra 2, 3, 4. Day Student Coun- 
cil 1, 2, 4. Poster Committee 4. 

"In solitude, where she is least alone." 

Do you like to see things done quietly and beautifully? 
Watch Hilda. Do you like to watch a musician play a violin 
as though she loved it? Again — watch Hilda. Are you an 
epicurean soul? If so, consult Hilda some summer in Marsh- 
field when she is spending her vacation there. We promise 
you — you won't be disappointed. 



LOUISE VIRGINIA HEWITT 

Centre Street, Pembroke. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Swimming 1. Basketball 1, 2. Hockey 1. Base- 
ball. Bowling 2, 3,4. French Club 1, 2. Drama- 
tic Club 2, 3, 4, President 4. Secretary of class 4. 

"Thou hast so much wit, and mirth, and spleen 

about thee, 
That there's no living with thee, or without thee." 

Don't you enjoy people who are essentially themselves? 
"Squeaks" is, — especially in the case of a laugh. In fact the 
only times she changes are when we see her as an imitator of 
George Arliss in our own Dramatic Club productions. One 
of her strongest points is her ardent home-town boosting. 
Have you ever listened to her "soap box orations"? 




25 



1933 ALPHA 




BARBARA TUCKER HORTON 

2280 Washington Street, Canton. Sec.-Treas. 
of Normal Hall 3. Library Club 2, 3, 4. Hockey 
2, 3, 4. Bowling 3. Dormitory Council 3. 

"She broke no promise, serv'd no private end, 
She gained no title and lost no friend." 

Though quiet and unassuming, Barbara has many valuable 
suggestions and ideas. Composition is her forte. To read 
her stories and feature articles is to appreciate what well- 
written news means. Her reticence of manner is somewhat 
deceiving, for who is there any more willing to enter into a 
good time? 



ELAINE GOODRICH HOWE 

Bolton. Library Club 4. W. A. A. 3, 4. 

"Gladness of heart is the life of man, and joyful- 
ness prolongeth our days." 

Elaine epitomizes the expression, "good sport", character- 
ized by her everlasting good nature, her notorious giggle, and 
her "uh uh" which strangely enough expresses the most 
intense interest. Two troubles haunt her constantly — she 
has brown eyes, and she can never look sophisticated. 





VIRGINIA STEWART HOWLAND 



W. A. A. 2, 3. 



1239 Warren Avenue, Brockton. 
Hockey 1. Scouts 2. 

"Each day she's done some new good turn, 
Some one to help, not praise to earn." 

"Smilingly helpful" best describes Virginia to those of us 
who have needed aid. In both work and play her effervescent 
humor and cheerfulness are evident. Would that we all 
had her calm assurance and her optimism when confronted 
with a hard problem! Because of her scientific inclination, 
she has saved many a geography class from embarrassment. 



26 



CLASSES 



BEATRICE ALICE HUNT 

6 Water Street Ext., Plymouth. Glee Club 
2, 3, 4. Choir 1, 2, 3, 4. Student Council 1, 2, 3. 
Class Rep., 1, 2, 3. Day Student Council 1, 2, 3, 
Vice-Pres. 3. W. A. A. 1, 2. Social Activities 
Comm. 3, Sec. 3. Topics of the Day Club 3, 4. 
President 4. Normal Offering Asst. Editor 3. 
Editor in Chief 4. 

"The reason firm, the temperate will, 
Endurance, foresight, strength, and skill." 

To know Bea is to admire her versatility, her charm of 
manner, and her efficiency. Foremost in every endeavor she 
undertakes, and brimming over with enthusiasm for work and 
play alike, Bea has found the fullest participation and en- 
joyment in all activities here at college. 





MARION IRENE KEITH 

460 Plymouth Street, East Bridgewater. W.A.A. 
4. Hobby Club 4. Day Student Council 3, 4. 

"With gentle yet prevailing force, 
Intent upon her destined course." 

Optimistic? Marion makes a specialty of looking for 
"something different", each time expecting something better 
without acquiring the jaded weariness of the sophisticate. 
Speculative brown eyes provide ample substitution for jig- 
saw puzzles — both take time to figure out. 



CATHERINE AGNES KELLY 

3 Newbury St., Roslindale. 

"The quiet mind is richer than a crown." 

Catherine's short stay at Bridgewater has made us truly 
believe that she has accepted Carlyle's admonition that 
"thought will not work except in silence." As a well-balanced 
individual, she is willing at all times to share her serious 
moments; as a keen appreciator of wit and humor, she invites 
that particular contagion which we all like to feel at times. 




27 



1933 ALPHA 




MARIE ELIZABETH KELLY 

A. B., Emanuel College 
3 Newbury Street, Roslindale. 

"Persuasion tips her tongue whene'er she talks." 

Would you be revolutionized in all your pet prejudices? 
Then pause in your travel to hear those arguments as she 
summons them into battle array; follow her as she builds 
up ramparts about them out of the material which a life of 
historical reading offers. She will not be carried along by 
the common current, but will courageously take her place 
as a lover of wisdom and a defender of truth. 



STELLA HELENA KRUPKA 

7 Fitch Terrace, Randolph. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4, Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4, Tennis 3, 
Track 1, 2, 3, Basketball 1, 2, 4. Glee Club 2, 3, 
4. Hobby Club 3, 4, Sec. 3, Pres. 4. Day Stu- 
dent Council 4. 

'"Tis thy dream to make the rainbow sing, 
To make a stone leap to the sky." 

Found! The secret of success! — What? Love of people, a 
sunny disposition, and varied interests. — In whom? Stella — 
Where? On any team in sports, in the art rooms, or at the 
most congenial spot in the commuters' room. — When? Any- 
time . . Continuous office hours to remedy all ailments. 





GERTRUDE LOUISE LAIRD 

West Barnstable. Campus Comment 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Editor 3, 4. Normal Offering 2. French Club 
1, 2. W. A. A. 1, 2. 

"With irony in look 
Poetry peeps into my heart." 

Words are indeed only the "skin of thought" when de- 
scribing Gertrude. They seem such futile weapons with 
which to pierce that coat of reserve that so sheathes the 
friendliness and sincerity beneath it. Her common sense 
bears fruit in the capable management of Campus Comment. 
But her uncommon sense — ah! therein lie her fascination 
and subtlety. 



28 



CLASSES 



MABEL HELENE LARAMEE 

45 Park Street, Palmer. Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Choir 1. French Club 1, 2, 
3, 4. Dormitory Council 2, 3, 4. President of 
Normal Hall 4. 

"Large was her bounty; and her soul sincere." 

"Tout bien ou rien" must constitute Mabel's philosophy 
of life, for she carries her entire personality into whatever 
activity she undertakes. Appreciated? Yes! Why? For 
her conscientious efforts in French Club and her tactful sym- 
pathy as "Mother Confessor" of Normal Hall. 





ELIZABETH LAWRENCE 

121 Chickatabot Road, Quincy. Student Coun- 
cil 1, 4, Pres. 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Pres. 3. Bas- 
ketball 1, 4. Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Life Saving 1. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Choir 1, 4. 
Scouts 2. Class Secretary 2. 

"A perfect woman, nobly planned 
To warm, to comfort and command." 

Here is one whose efficiency and many accomplishments 
have never changed her. Freshman and senior alike feel 
that all-encompassing sense of charm and dignity, those same 
qualities which preserve the traditional standard of student 
government at Bridgewater. 



ANNA KATHERINE LEARY 

154 Hanover Street, Fall River. W. A. A. 1, 2, 
3, 4, Hockey 1, 4. Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4. Scouts 
1, 2. Topics of the Day Club 4. 

"There is no joy but calm." 

Could you picture lovable Mother Cary standing with a 
violin bow in her hand, tapping her foot when in and out of 
tune with the world? That's Anna — her heart as wide as 
her smile and as true as those blue orbs of hers which never 
could stop at a mildly surprised look. One big vote for a 
"top 'o the mornin' " personality. 




29 



1933 ALPHA 




MARY CECILIA LEWIS 

484 Commercial Street, Provincetown. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3. Hobby Club 3. Garden Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

"And all I ask is a tall ship 
And a star to steer her by." 

Mary is thoroughly interested in the theatre — especially 
in the new American drama portrayed by Eugene O'Neil. 
She has a true love for sand dunes, ships, and swimming. 
But oh, how Mary does dislike those sarcastic proctors who 
are always "shushing" people. 



MILDRED KIDDER MacDONALD 

27 Beacon Street, Gloucester. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. 
Culture Fund Committee 3, 4. Hobby Club 3, 4. 
Pres. of Woodward Hall 4. Vice-Pres. of Dormi- 
tory Council 4. Assistant Stage Manager of 
Dramatic Club 3. Stage Manager 4. 

"Her presence lends its warmth and health 
To all who come before it." 

Those who have seen only the dignity of Woodward Hall's 
president, have missed much of — Mildred. Only those who 
really know her can appreciate the president submerged by 
the friend. 





DORIS VIVIAN MacGINNIS 

412 Maple Street, Marlboro. Glee Club 2, 3, 4. 
Choir 2, 3, 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, W. A. A. Board 
4, Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4, Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Baseball 
1, 2, 3, 4, Soccer 3, 4. Archery 2, 3. 

"I'm freedom's happy bond-slave." 

Where would our class teams be without Dot, who is ever 
ready for any and all games? How she does shoot those 
baskets! In her social, studious, and athletic life at B. T. C. 
we find her a never-failing sport. Even such a jolly person 
has aversions. Just mention quiet hour rules in the dorm 
to learn Dot's pet "thorn in the flesh." 



30 



CLASSES 



MYRTLE RUTH MACLEOD 

90 Botolph Street, Atlantic. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, 
W. A. A. Board 2, Secretary 2, Bowling 1, 2, 3, 
Head of Bowling 2, Tenniquoit 2, 3, Volley Ball 
2, 3, Soccer 3, 4. 

"Life is the game that must be played: 
So live and laugh, nor be dismayed." 

Myrtle has a pet attraction and a pet aversion. She is 
devotedly attached to a certain carnivorous animal, Fclis 
Domestica, (those who know her can explain to the nth 
degree the traits of Rinty the unsurpassed). And if you want 
to get in her bad graces, just call her a quiet little girl. 

Myrtle respects the Scottish age-old tradition of thrift 
and reveals the adventurous spirit of her ancestors by a love 
for geograpli3'. 





ELEANOR MARTIN 

17 Bicknell Street, Marlborough. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4. French Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treas. 4. Hobby 
Club 3, 4, Sec. 4. Topics of the Day Club 3, 4. 
Dormitory Council 4. 

"I go to seek on many roads 
What is to be." 

Deeply interested in studying, but not the type of person 
who wouldn't help someone else, Eleanor yet has time for 
her hobbies. When she does steal a moment for herself, 
Eleanor may be seen leaving for a hike to look up some old 
house. Dependability is her middle name, and miracle of 
miracles! — capability and efficiency are also found wrapped 
up in this one person. 



ALOYSE VERONICA MITCHELL 

166 Aquidneck Street, New Bedford. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4, Hockey 1, 3, 4, Baseball 1, 4, Basketball 
1, 2, 3, 4, Head of Minor Sports 2, Head of Basket- 
ball 3, Head of Baseball 4. Scouts 1. 

"Half of success is getting courage to begin, and 
the other half is sticking to it until you win." 

Who was that we saw flashing down the hockey field, guard- 
ing her opponent in basketball, pitching the best baseball 
game of the season? Mitch did all this to perfection. East 
Bridgewater has derived great benefit from this vim, vigor, 
and vitality of hers. Mitch can be all seriousness when the 
occasion demands, but we like her beaming countenance 
better. 




31 



1933 ALPHA 




MONA ELIZABETH MORRIS 

129 Winter Street, Norwood. Student Council 
4, Vice-Pres. 4. Social Activities Committee 3, 4, 
Chairman 4. Topics of the Day Club 3, 4, Sec. 
3, 4. Orchestra 2, 3. 

"Fashioned so purely, 
Fragilely, surely." 

One cannot think of Mona without picturing a bit of human- 
ity not unlike a China doll. She claims that the secret of her 
sylphlike qualities is plenty of food and more of sleep. Yet, 
she possesses some magic quality whereby her work is always 
done, without burning the candle at both ends. Mona's 
personality and charm, as well as her sense of humor, are a 
few of her qualities that are truly enviable. 



ALICE CATHERINE MOYNIHAN 

543 North Montello Street, Brockton. W. A. A. 

1, 2, 3. Basketball 1, 2, 3. Hockey 1, 2. Soccer 

2. Baseball 2. 

"A heart of gold 
Is wealth untold." 

One cannot forget Alice, for the wealth of friendship which 
she has acquired from day to day, by the quiet atmosphere 
which her very presence creates. It will be a pleasure to 
keep Alice in our treasury of memories. 





HELEN ELIZABETH MURLEY 

107 North William Street, Fairhaven. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Orchestra 3, 4. 
Choir 1, 2, 3, 4. Camera Club 3. Scouts 1, 3, 4, 
Treas. 4. Campus Comment 3. 

"Gentle in manner, firm in reality." 

Studying for tests does not bother Helen, but she usually 
comes out on top. This must be due to her great powers of 
concentration and her ability to work quickly. Helen and 
her flute have proved a valuable addition to our orchestra. 
Can we suppose that interest in Mr. Durgin's Math, class is 
responsible for Helen's accuracy in reading music? 



32 



CLASSES 



ETHEL FRANCES MURRAY 



41 Brook Street, Brockton. 
Hobby Club 4. Dancing 4. 



W. A. A. 1, 2, 4. 



"She seemed with grace to win, with heart to hold." 

One of those few people who can always be counted on to 
get their work in on time is Ethel Murray, she who shows 
the same deep interest either in relating week-end experiences 
of in faithfully studying American History. And with all 
her "Busyness" Ethel still has time for her favorite hobby, 
collecting cartoons. 





MIRIAM ELIZABETH NISULA 

1 Carlmark Street, West Quincy. Library Club 
1, 2, 3, 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Choir 1, 2. 

"When my cue comes, call me, and I will answer." 

Miriam impresses one so with her nonchalance that if one 
did not know her well, she might be accused of indifference. 
But underneath, she is as vitally interested in school activities 
as is any one else. She occasionally furnishes the class diver- 
sion with her spontaneous outbursts of laughter, though she 
is otherwise very quiet, usually occupied with the perusal of 
latest novels or the daily news. 



RUTH ANN NUGENT 

11 Bartlett Parkway, Winthrop. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4. Choir 1, 2, 3, 4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 
4, Vice-Pres. 3. Social Activities Committee 4. 
Dormitory Council 4. Vice-Pres. Normal Hall 4. 

"The joy of youth and health 
Her eyes displayed." 

We mention Ruth's eyes because they are so truly an in- 
dication of that health and vitality and wholesomeness so 
characteristic of her. Here is the typical college girl — not too 
athletic, not too scholarly, socially charming, and individually 
interesting. 




33 



1933 ALPHA 




ANGELINE SOPHIE PLAZA 

284 Earle Street, New Bedford. W. A. A. 1, 2, . 
3. Science Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Garden Club 1, 2, 3. 
Hobby Club 4. 

"As merry as the day is long." 

Here is one of our peppiest classmates. The gang isn't 
complete without Angeline's gay comradeship. However, 
all her talents are not confined to social interests. Step into 
English History for further information. 



LOUISE MILDRED PRATT 

33 Central Street, Whitman. Garden Club 2,3. 

"But it is not her air, her form, her face. 
Tis the mind that shines in ev'ry grace." 

Louise has that refreshing combination of sophistication, 
sweetness, and the ability to attract through her graciousness. 
No matter what anyone wishes to talk about, Louise is always 
ready and always interesting. And when she gets excited 
about — well, anything — don't you love the way her hair 
bobs about? 





HELEN RAFKIN 

65 Oakdale Street, Brockton. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 
4. Normal Offering 2. Hobby Club 4. 

"She taketh most delight in poetry." 

If diligence is an asset to professional life, Helen must be- 
come a success. Moreover she goes in a brown study over 
poetry, her preference lying in the deeper type. Draw her 
out and she will interpret the more beautiful passages of 
reading with a dramatic ability that "measures up." 



34 



CLASSES 



BARBARA RANDLETT 

63 Bower Street, Newton Center. Class Rep. 
1, 3. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4, Base- 
ball 1, 2, 3, 4, Track 1, 2, Dancing 1, Basketball 1. 
French Club 1. Pro and Con 1. Glee Club 1. 
Choir 1. Dramatic Club 2, 3, 4, Pres. 3. Kinder- 
garten Primary Club 3, 4, Executive Board 3. 
Culture Fund Committee 3, 4, Sec. 4. Pres. 
Dormitory Council 4. Student Council 1, 3, 4. 

"Whosoe'er fills her place has much for which to 

strive." 

Whence come those radical orations in "Soc." and American 
History classes? From "Rusty", our red-headed "dramati- 
tian and haranguer par excellence", whose eloquent out- 
bursts from time to time add unusually spicy contributions 
to an otherwise serene classroom. 





MARGARET LOUISE REARDON 

50 Academy Street, South Braintree. W. A. A. 
1, 2. Hockey 1. Basketball 2. Baseball 1, 2. 
Soccer 2. Day Student Council 2. Camera 
Club 3. 

"Like unto a cedar, proud and tall." 

Dare we prophesy? Let's predict few dull days for Peg 
if she goes through life seeing the happier side of it as she has 
here at Bridgewater. 



FRANCES ELLEN RYAN 

55 Franklin Street, South Braintree, Mass. 
W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, Hockey 1, 2, Basketball 1, 2, 
Baseball 2, 3. 

"Enthusiasm is the genius of sincerity, and 
truth accomplishes no victories without it." 

Haven't you met people whose weighty discourses bear 
you down to despondency? You can stand only a small dose 
before you long for someone like "Fran" whose never-failing 
and enthusiastic conversation gives a counter action. She 
may chat with you about her pet diversion of dancing. If 
this does not please your fancy, she can entertain equally 
well with the subject of sports. — Perhaps the keen reception 
of her words is partially due to the frequent punctuation of 
twinkling eyes to all she says. 




35 



1933 ALPHA 




GLADYS MAE RYAN 

131 Liberty Street, East Braintree. W. A. A.' 
1, 2, 3. Day Student Council 1, 2, 4. 

"There is a pleasure in the pathless wood, 
There is a rapture on the lonely shore." 

A companion for all hours — dark or bright — laughter- 
filled or work-laden, and not averse to a bit of amicable stern- 
ness. Generous and ready service for others colors all her 
actions. 



MARIE SARSON 



42 Studley Avenue, Brockton. 
4. Class Treasurer 1, 2, 3, 4. 



W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 



"A little maid with golden hair, 
Kindly eyes and winsome ways." 

Sarsie is just as her nickname may have led you to surmise, 
especially from her apropos answers in classes. She may be 
small but she manages to get there in time, whether it be 
making the goal in hockey or taking a twirl in the "gym" 
at noon. Quite a lot of vitality for one of her size! 





ELEANOR ELIZABETH SCHREIBER 

115 Court Street, Plymouth. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Head of Tennis 4, Head of Swimming 3, Hockey 
1, 3, 4, Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Baseball 1, Scouts 1, 2, 
Treasurer 2. Proctor in Woodward 2. 

"Not too good, because the good die young; 
Not foolish, not serious, just pleasantly happy." 

Our "Freckles", the slim greyhound type of person who 
is just as at home flying down the hockey field, jumping on 
the basketball court, twirling around the gym or demurely 
partaking of demi-tasse. She's uproarious when she's shy 
because then a gallant effort is being made to preserve a 
balance between dignity and "pure bleacherite." 



36 



CLASSES 



ELOUISE GWENDOLYN SHERMAN 



Church Street, Easton. 
Basketball 1, Baseball 1. 
4. 



W. A. A. 1, Hockey 1, 
Topics of the Day Club 



"Sometimes grave, sometimes gay, 
But we like her any way." 

An "escapade" by oneself isn't at all satisfactory, but make 
it a twosome with Elouise and the event deserves being spelled 
with a capital "E". Knowing her is to discover a surprising 
amount of good-natured wickedness for a young lady who 
parts her hair in the middle. 





JANE MARY SMITH 

Clark Street, Marion. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice- 
Pres. 3. Dormitory Council 3. Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Basketball 1, 2, 4. Scouts 1. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. 

"O, who will walk a mile with me along life's merry 
way?" 

Jane came back to us this year and we rejoice, fraternally, 
athletically and socially. With her name one associates 
hockey goals shot with a vengeance; baskets made through, 
over, or around any guard; Dormitory Council sales; history 
maps and lessons; and behind all of these a driving energy 
which makes Jane a natural and a successful leader. 



DORIS HELEN SPELLMAN 

44 Powder House Boulevard, Somerville. Day 
Student Council 1, 2, 3, 4. 

"So many worlds, so much to do, 
So little done, such things to be." 

An 8:35 express package — the stork couldn't have made 
better time or a gayer choice. Truth means much to Doris 
and we predict that she will always be happy, having dis- 
covered the art of extracting the brighter side and making a 
joke of the rest. 




37 



1933 ALPHA 




PHYLLIS MURIEL STEWART 

R. F. D., Barre. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. Garden 
Club 2, 3, 4, Treas. 3. Topics of the Day Club 4. 

"Life is a jest and all things show it 
I thought so once and now I know it." 

With a smile on her face, a twinkle in her eye, and a gay 
jest on her lips, Phil dances through life with never a care. 
While the rest of us are struggling under the load of tests, 
themes, and notebooks, Phil goes along without a worry in 
the world and emerges unscathed. She is the personification 
of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. 



ESTHER TARR 

64 Grant Street, Gardner. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Vice-Pres. 4, W. A. A. Board 3, 4. Hockey 1, 3, 4. 
Basketball 2, 4. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. Volley Ball 
3, 4. Scouts 1. Library Club 2, 3, 4. Camera 
Club 4, Sec. -Treas. 4. Dormitory Council 4, 
Sec. -Treas. 4. 

"To her will come the finest things in life, 
Because to life she gives the best." 

Just a glance at Esther's activities gives you a good idea 
as to why we always see her on the move — going somewhere — 
doing something. But it doesn't make you feel the forceful- 
ness of her splendidly conceived arguments in "Soc", backed 
by all the force of her vigorous nature. 





ELSIE HILDEGARD TAYLOR 

7 Aiken Street, So. Dartmouth. W. A. A. 1, 2, 
3, 4, W. A. A. Board 4, Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4, Basket- 
ball 1, 2, 3, 4, Baseball 1, 2, 4, Tenniquoit 2. Scouts 
1. Library Club 2, 3, 4, Vice-Pres. 4. Campus 
Comment 4. 

"A vivacious, petite and lovable mite, 
Quite droll, by the way, but not perfect, don't 
fear." 

Elsie seems such a small person for all that cheerfulness, 
naivete and vivacity; yet withal she still has enough energy 
left to be an ardent sport enthusiast. We rather held our 
breath this last winter when we heard that our "mite" had 
contracted to settle all basketball difficulties, large or small, 
which might occur during W. A. A. games at the gym. But 
Elsie's native cautiousness dispelled all our fears. 



38 



CLASSES 



ROSE ALMA TINSLEY 

47 Hale Street, Bridgewater. Dramatic Club 
2, 3, 4, Wardrobe Mistress 4. Choir 1. Campus 
Comment 1, 2, 3. W. A. A. 1, 2. 

"Oh and proudly stood she up! 
Her heart within her ne'er did fall!" 

One cannot but admire her poise particularly when ar- 
dently championing the right. Who would suspect that 
under this exterior lies a dramatic sympathy that enables 
her to put Rose in the background and become a Hamlet 
pondering over an uncertain fate, or a Mrs. Wiggs spading 
her famous cabbages? She is one of those few who can meet 
other people's moods. 





DOROTHY ELLEN VAUGHN 

64 Dyer Avenue, Whitman. Hobby Club 4. 
"So assured a friend that we could be silent." 

"Little by little" is the best way of getting a great deal of 
work done, Dot has found. And quietness fosters industry, 
so we find out little of what she has done until it is all over. 
Service unheralded marks her progress. 



BARBARA BLAKENEY VINAL 

Taunton Road, Middleboro. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Hockey 1, 2. Soccer 3, 4, Basketball 2, 3, 4. Base- 
ball 2, 4. Camera Club 2, 3, 4, President 3. Day 
Student Council 1, 2, 3, 4, Pres. 4. Poster Com- 
mittee 4. 

"In every deed, she had a heart to resolve, a 
head to contrive, and a hand to execute." 

Barb's persevering leadership has expanded itself every 
year we have known her. She transmits a certain strength 
and freshness to all of us. In truth, Barbara excels in every 
art, including that enviable one of making and keeping friends. 




39 



1933 ALPHA 




IRMA ILONA WAARANEN 

110 Leamy Street, Gardner. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 
French Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Sec. 2, 3. Campus Com- ' 
ment Board 4. Hockey 1, 2, 4. Baseball 1, 2. 
Basketball 1, 2, 4. Tenniquoit 3. 

"The thousandth time may prove the charm." 

An independent, imperturbable young person, Irma. For 
four years, we have enjoyed that elusive quality which makes 
her so attractive a person to know. There is nothing Irma 
enjoys more than a good stiff set of tennis or a lively argument. 
Of keen intellect and quick wit, she lends animation and 
powerful opposition to any discussion. 



EMMA STORY WHITE 

314 Belmont Street, Brockton. W. A. A. 4. 
Orchestra 2, 3, 4. Normal Offering 3. Campus 
Comment 2, 3. Science Club 1. 



"Her words are bonds, her oaths are oracles, 
Her love sincere, her thoughts immaculate." 

The Junior Prom with its silver snowflakes — blue bunting — 
lanterns — these are unforgettable memories that must ever 
be attached to Emma's name in our minds. Only her ability 
to get people to work together so willingly and so harmoniously 
could have transformed the gym into so lovely a setting for 
our Prom. 





ALBERT AVITABILE 

214 Granite Avenue, Braintree. N. A. A. 1, 2, 
3, 4, Basketball 1, 2, Baseball 1, 2, Soccer 1, 2, 3. 
Men's Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Lyceum 1, 2, 3, 4. 

"Talents you have not one or two, 
Talents are yours in plenty." 

Quiet and amiable, sincerely earnest, a fine companion, 
and an able classmate. 



40 



CLASSES 



FREDERIC ELLWOOD BAILEY 
Ph. B., Brown University 

42 Woodside Avenue, Brockton. Men's Club 
4. N. A. A. 4. Basketball 4. 

"With gentle yet prevailing force, 
Intent upon his destined course." 

Fred, on short acquaintance, seems to be rather a shy, re- 
tiring, if not downright bashful individual. Such is not the 
case, however. It is merely his extreme modesty which leads 
one to gather this impression. 

Socially, athletically, and scholastically, Fred has earned a 
place for himself at Bridgewater during his one year's stay. 




JOHN ELZA BALDWIN 

A. B., Brown University 

60 Wheeler Avenue, Brockton. Men's Club 4. 
N. A. A. 4. 

"Thus he alone could boast the art 
To charm at once and sting the heart." 

Normal Hall reception room, the walks to the garden and 
the cemetery, the gym at noon, — he knew them all. Such 
progress in six months! His jaunty, enthusiastic personality 
proved to be an "Open Sesame" to the inner secrets of Bridge- 
water. 



ROBERT SURREY BEATON 
A. B. Bowdoin 

14 Adams Street, Brockton. N. A. A. 4. Men's 
Club 4. 

"Silence is golden." 

Silence may be golden to Bob, but once that silence is 
broken, he is a "bel esprit" of the highest order, conscientious, 
full of fun, a more than worthy addition to Bridgwater. 



41 



1933 ALPHA 



RALPH GORDON BUMPUS 

B. S., Rhode Island State College 

203 Market Street, Campello. N. A. A. 4. 
Men's Club 4. 

"To look within is to find the gold." 

Silent but knowing, able and dependable, a fine classmate 
and pleasurable companion. 



HAROLD BERNARD BUTLER 

122 Maple Street, Bridgewater. N. A. A. 4. 
Men's Club 4. 

"What his breast forges, that his tongue must 
vent." 

Having travelled all over the United States as a business 
man, and having served two years in France during the World 
War, it is probable that Harold has led the most colorful 
life of any student at Bridgewater. 

A former student of M. I. T., his scientific propensities 
and his outstanding work in mathematics are generally known ; 
but only his friends are aware of and appreciate his deeply 
philosophical nature. 





RALPH WILLIAM CREEDON 

77 Dyer Ave., Milton. N. A. A. 4. Men's Club 
4. Men's Glee Club 4. Orchestra 4. 

"Much have I travelled in the realms of gold." 

Life to Ralph is a serious business proposition ; consequent- 
ly he attacks each day's work with self-reliance. Such a 
course would be dreary were it not for the moments of re- 
laxation that he finds with his violin, or the inspiration glean- 
ed from his extensive reading. 



42 



CLASSES 



PAUL HENRY FORD 

84 Herrod Avenue, Brockton. N. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 
4. Tennis 2. Basketball 4, Men's Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Orchestra 1, Hobby Club 4. 

"His speech was a fine sample, on the whole 
Of rhetoric, which the learn'd called 'rigmarole'." 

A swaggering walk like that of a sailor on his first leave, 
the possession of an exuberance of verbosity, and a manner 
of dancing similar to a gigolo's, are only a few characteristics 
that have made him popular. 




MARTIN COOPER HUBBARD 
A. B. Bates College 

2106 Washington Street, South Braintree. 
N. A. A. 4. Men's Club 4. 

"What liberty 
A loosened spirit belongs!" 

Any spot where Martin is, is sure to be one of levity, and 
good nature. And does he like psychology! 



CLIFFORD BERTRAM JOHNSON 

24 Lawrence Street, Waltham. Class Pres. 
1, 2, 3, 4. N. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Pres. 4. Soccer 2, 3. 
Basketball 2, 3. Tennis 3, 4. Men's Club 1, 2, 3, 
4, Sec. 4. Student Council 1, 2, 3, 4. Normal 
Offering 2, 3, 4, Business Mgr. 3, 4. Orchestra 
1, 2, 3. 

"I am the master of my fate, 
I am the captain of my soul." 

Since he has been so recognized a leader in all types of 
school activity from his freshman year on, there has ever 
been present in our minds a question as to how Clif could 
possibly improve. 

A naturally serious young man, his many responsibilities 
have not changed that quiet air of good-natured dignity. 
But it can be said that Clif is much more sociable than when 
he entered Bridgewater. Haven't you noticed how much 
more inclined he is to chat with you? 



43 




1933 ALPHA 



WILLIAM GEORGE JOHNSON 

105 Norfolk Street, Wollaston. Men's Club 
1, 2, 3, 4, Pres. 4. Lyceum 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-Pres. 
3, 4. N. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. Class Rep. 4. Social 
Activities Comm. 4. Student Council 4. Camera 
Club 4. 

"None but himself can be his parallel." 

Here's to "Bill" our "Ass't. Dean of Men" — the boy who 
tried to get us to attend Chapel — that is when he was there 
himself. Also the boy who ran the Men's Club so success- 
fully for the first time in years and years. Another of Bill's 
accomplishments was the passing of the Frosh penmanship 
course — after four years of "hand labor." 



EVERETT RUSSELL LAYS 

B. S., Bowdoin College 

North Byron Avenue, Brockton. N. A. A. 4. 
Men's Club 4. 

"A vous faire rire 

To cure all who mope 
Mes enfants, il aspire 

My friends, is his hope." 

We understand that Ev, at times, is seized by choking 
and hiccoughing spells. We would suggest that he carry a 
bottle of peppermint water and on such aforesaid occasions 
take a teaspoonful every five or ten minutes until relieved. 
It is his present ambition to make "un tour du monde". We 
wish him "Success" and may his jovial spirit ever stay by 
him. Regards are sent from the horse he rode at Bowdoin. 




LOUIS LERNER 

11 Crowell Street, Dorchester. Men's Club 
1, 2, 3, 4. N. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. Lyceum 1, 2, 3, 4, 
President 4. Alpha 4. 

"Strong in will 
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield." 

Louis is not much concerned with the frivolities of life. 
With his scientific and logical observations, he has straighten- 
ed out many a snag in class discussions. 

One could always tell when there was to be a good chapel 
program for then, and only then, did Louis put in an appear- 



44 



CLASSES 



ARTHUR ANSEL LEWIS 
Ph. B., Brown University 

80 West Britannia Street, Taunton. Business 
Manager, Campus Comment 4. Men's Club 4. 
Orchestra 4. Glee Club 4. 

"They can because they think they can." 

Art was graduated from Brown last June with a Ph. B. 
degree. Now he's spent a year here, become a pedagogue 
and annexed a B. S. in Ed. degree. Watch out, old ther- 
mometer! 





URBAN JOSEPH LINEHAN 

459 High Street, Bridgewater. Culture Fund 
Committee 4. Campus Comment, Adv. Mgr. 3. 
N. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Treas. 2. Athletic Council 2. 
Men's Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treas. 2. Men's Council 
1, 2. Lyceum 1, 2, 3, 4. Class Rep. 1. Student 
Council 1. 

"I must mix myself with action 
Lest I wither by despair." 

If a slight liberty were taken with the name "Urban" we 
would surely recognize a solution to one of the problems that 
fathers, mothers, and in-laws wrestle about — what to name 
the baby. Urbane, he is, extending a truly personal courtesy 
as representative of the Culture Fund and Bridgewater stu- 
dents to those who have come here to speak to us. 

Yes, he drives a Ford, far from these urban limits; and 
when conveying Lyceum members to the State Farm, even 
Miss Lovett finds it a task to keep up with him. 




GEORGE PHILIP LOWDER 

280 Broadway, Arlington. Men's Club 1, 2, 3, 
4, Vice-Pres. 3. N. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-pres. 4. 
Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. Tennis 
2, 3, Capt. 4. 

"No sleep till morn, 
When youth and pleasure meet." 

George's perpetual good nature has made him one of the 
most popular men in the class of 1933. He delights in "rid- 
ing" people, but he also can "take it". He has his serious 
moments also (outside Woodward as well as in.) 




45 



1933 ALPHA 




FRANK JOSEPH McMAHON 

119 Lenox Avenue. Pittsfield. N. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4,' 
Soccer 2, 3, 4, Mgr. Baseball 2, Basketball 2, 4. 
Men's Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Glee Club 4. 

"There are only two qualities in the world; — 
efficiency and inefficiency; and only two sorts 
of people: — the efficient and the inefficient." 

When the A class wanted a manager and leader, be it for 
sports, socials, or proms, they called on Mac — and it was done. 



LOUIS VICTOR MILICI 

26 Woodville Street, Roxbury. Normal Offer- 
ing 1, 2, 3, Asst. Advt. Mgr. 2, Advt. Mgr. 3. Ly- 
ceum 1, 2, 3, 4. Glee Club 3, 4, Pres. 4. Men's 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. N. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 
2, Asst. Mgr. 2. Soccer 2, 4. 

"This only grant me, that my means may lie 
Too low for envy, for contempt too high." 

To study life and achieve more happiness thereby — Vic's 
manifested objective. 





ROBERT JAMES NAGLE 

535 Second Street, Fall River. N. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 
4, Council 3, 4, Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4, Mgr. 3, 4, Basket- 
ball 3, 4, Mgr. 4, Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4, Mgr. 3, 4. 
Men's Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Men's Council 1, 2. Lyceum 
1, 2. Alpha 4. 

"Surprised by joy, impatient as the wind." 

A few years ago, Gene Stratton Porter made famous a 
certain "Keeper of the Bees"; this yearbook may do likewise 
for the keeper of the school store. His witty line of sales- 
manship has been partly responsible for keeping trade on the 
upward slant. This ability wasn't devoted, however, to 
this single line of endeavor; all have had occasion to enjoy 
his original, sparkling, chapel announcements. 



46 



CLASSES 



WALTER NARDELLI 

74 Huntington Street, Brockton. N. A. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4, Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4, Capt. 4, Tennis 3, 4. 
Men's Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4. Ly- 
ceum 1, 3. Camera Club 3. Men's Glee Club 4. 

"We're born to be happy, all of us." 

A versatile Don Juan of the basketball court with spon- 
taneous laughter in his eyes, and on his lips satire, is the pop- 
ular Walter Nardelli alias "Signor Pascuali". 





VINCENT NAVEROUSKIS 

1004 S. Franklin St., Brookville. N. A. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4. Soccer 2, 3, 4. Men's Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4. Lyceum 2, 3. Camera Club. 

"Music, when soft voices die, 
Vibrates in the memory." 

Vin moves in a world far removed from anyone else. Though 
he is reticent of manner, there is a wealth of knowledge and 
humor stored behind that outward calm. Music seems to 
be his primary interest, and Wagner, Beethoven, or any other 
master is not just a "nodding acquaintance" to him. 



SAMUEL SOLMER 

80 Tremont Street, Taunton. Photographic 
Editor of Alpha 4. Student Council 3, Class 
Rep. 3, Lyceum 4. Men's Club 2, 3, 4. N. A. A. 
2, 3, 4. Hobby Club 4. 

"The rule of his life is to make business a pleasure." 

Good old Sam. Here's a carefree lad who knows the world. 
His experience ranges from agriculture to pedagogy, a truly 
representative source for those arguments of his. 




47 



1933 ALPHA 




JOHN SWEENEY 

300 Oak St., Bridgewater. N. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Business Manager 4, Basketball 1, 2, Baseball 
1, 2, 3. Campus Comment 2, 3, 4. Lyceum 1. 

"Hunt half a day for a bit of news." 

John has been a well-known figure in the realm of sport, 
first coming into prominence early in his freshman year as a 
consistent and valuable participant in varsity athletics. 
Later when opportunity and his talents offered a chance to 
enter newspaper work, he again won recognition, this time 
on the sporting pages of several newspapers. A good share 
of common sense and a faculty for accurately appraising 
situations have undoubtedly had much to do with John's 
success both in and outside of school. 



HAROLD SAWYER TROSTERUD 



27 Goodwin Street, Fitchburg. 
Men's Club 4. N. A. A. 4. 



Glee Club 4. 



"A kinder gentleman treads not the earth." 

A graduate of Fitchburg Normal School, a teacher for five 
years, a most versatile athlete, and a fine musician, Harold 
came here in September '32 to work for his degree. This 
rather formidable reputation for those of us who have been 
only "under-grads" has not prevented us from relishing his 
genial nature. 





EDWARD FRANCIS WELCH 

53 Hamilton Street, North Abington. Men's 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. N. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-Pres. 1. 
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Coach of Basketball 2, 
Soccer 2, Baseball 4. Social Activities Comm. 1. 

"The heights by great men reached and kept 
Were not attained by sudden flight." 

Eddie has spent four profitable years at B. T. C. and he 
has furnished us some spectacular moments with his athletic 
proficiency. He directed the destinies of the basketball 
squad for two years as student coach. Independent, in 
thought and action, he has created an outstanding niche in 
our student world. 



48 



CLASSES 



KATHERINE FOOTE 
February 28, 1932 



Senior Ode 



The carols of the morning mood 

Can not be sweeter than thy name, 

In ivy garb of shrouded Hope 

A blossomed Wisdom was thy gift. 

While pointing starward past the hills 

O, Alma Mater, thou in love 

Did'st lead and guide the blessed quest 

Of finding Beauty, hewing Truth. 

So dear, thy gift of comradeship, 

To each, the dimness of adieu 

We know how often thou hast felt 
Such partings in thy ripened years. 
Yet, courage-tipped thy whitest words 
Come from the living past; we've known 
And loved its sweetest claim to life, 
Of service won for gift to all. 



Pauline C. Donovan 



49 



1933 ALPHA 




President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Earle Sukeforth 

Marjorie Hunken 

Esther Lindberg 

Dorothy Colby 



History for Year 1932-1933 

The class is rather broken up this year, of course, because of practice teaching; and, in 
many cases, we are like "ships that pass in the night" as one crew returns and another em- 
barks upon the great adventure. 

Nevertheless, at times we do find occasion to get together and these are red letter days 
on the Junior calendar. One of these merry occasions — which is as it should be for are we 
not jolly Juniors? — was our prom. This year the sophomores joined us in giving the affair 
as there is to be no Junior prom next year. — We danced beneath the cold blue glow of the 
northern lights in a land of snow and towering icebergs — . Then we looked forward to 
the Junior Social. 

We, who such a short time ago were lowly Freshmen, find it rather hard at times to 
realize just where the years have gone. This has been another glad year and yet, at times, 
we cannot help feeling sad at the thought that for some of the "jolly Juniors" this is the 
last year at Bridgewater. But then — The very best of luck to you, my dears! 

Esther Lindberg, Secretary. 



50 



CLASSES 



KATHRYN MARY BARITEAU 

33 Concord St., Maynard. W. A. A. 1. 2. Cam- 
pus Comment 1. Topics of the Day Club 2. 
Normal Offering 2. 

"The time has come," the Walrus said, 

"To talk of many things: 
Of shoes and ships — and sealing wax — 
Of cabbages and kings." 

One word alone can characterize K.— eloquence! In her 
case silence is only silver, and speech is golden. Best of all, 
good humor crowns her whole personality which she gener- 
ously shares with so many. 





GERTRUDE ANNA BARNES 

33 Trimount Street, Dedham. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 
W. A. A. Board, Treas. 3. Hockey 1, 2, 3. Bas- 
ketball 1. BasebalM, 2. Volley Ball 2. Garden 
Club 1. Normal Offering Board 2. 

"Who will come with me for an hour's carnival?" 

Gert showed B5 how to look on the sunny side of life by 
her own clear example of a personality brimming over with 
vitality. She just wouldn't be idle; and as a result hockey, 
basketball, and baseball teams gained a skilled and most 
loyally enthusiastic member. You'd enjoy Gert's serious 
moments, too! She does have them! 



EVELYN GERTRUDE BEANE 

223 Grafton Street, Brockton. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. 
Tenniquoit 1, 2, Head of Tenniquoit 3. Hockey 
1, 2, 3, Volley Ball 1, 2, Baseball 1, 2. Tennis 1. 
Basketball 1, 2. Class Representative 2, 3. Camp- 
us Comment 1. 

"Who best bear his mild yoke, they serve him best. 
They also serve who only stand and wait." 

Being "Class Rep" for two years has not bowed Evelyn's 
shoulders. She merely throws them back a little farther 
and walks a little faster to accomplish the many demands the 
day makes of her. Efficiency in her case is not hardening, 
for Evelyn is a dreamer as well as a "doer" and anyone who 
has seen her art work can testify to its true creative beauty. 




51 



1933 ALPHA 




HARRIET HILL BROWN 

11 Sagamore Street, Lynn. Scouts 1, 2. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3. Social Activities 2. Pres. of Gates 3. 

"Persuasive speech and more persuasive sighs 
Silence that spoke, and eloquence of eyes." 

This isn't a "beauty culture" column but here's one hint. 
The secret of Hat's cheerful and wholesome appearance is 
her insatiable appetite for apples and a few "daily dozens" 
worked in on the sly! 



VIRGINIA MAE BULGER 

31 Chestnut Street, Maiden. Dramatic Club 
2, 3. Dancing 1, 2. Scouts 1. Tenniquoit 1, 2. 

"The love for beauty brings the happiness 
That will model a crown for your success." 

Virginia is one of the fortunate few who find contentment 
not in the daily occurrences of life alone, but in the broader 
field of art, drama, poetry, and dancing. Give "Ginger" 
a pair of lounging pajamas, a box of candy, and a book of 
poetry, and you have fulfilled her requests for the day. Ask 
her to go dancing, write poetry, or take the leading part in a 
play, and she will comply with your wish; but whatever you 
do, I beg of you, don't ask her to get up for breakfast. 





RUTH WADLEIGH BURR 

Main Street, South Hingham. Class Rep. 
1, 2, 3. Choir 1, 2. Glee Club 1, 2, 3. Student 
Council 1, 2, 3. 

"The heavens such grace did lend her that she 
might admired be." 

Dignity and a calm assurance have marked Ruth's progress 
through school. It may have been these characteristics which 
influenced freshmen classmates to elect her their representa- 
tive that first year, but we feel sure she has retained the honor 
by her gracious and friendly spirit. 



52 



CLASSES 



HELEN CAPUANO 

2 Williams Court, Somerville. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. 
Hockey 1. Tenniquoit 2. Volley Ball 2. Day 
Student Council 2. 

"To those who know thee not, no words can paint; 
And those who know thee, know all words are 
faint!" 

Our Helen is neat and nice, but not too nice to be interest- 
ing. If you gain her friendship, like Midas' touch, it turns 
all to gold. 





HELEN MAY CASTRO 

26 Purchase Street, Taunton. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. 
Hockey 1, 2, 3. Basketball 1, 2. Volley Ball 1, 2, 
3. Baseball 1, 2. Tenniquoit 1, 2. Interpretive 
Dancing 1, 2. TennisT. 

"There's nothing so kingly as kindness 
And nothing so royal as truth." 

Belying her proud and dignified carriage, Helen is the un- 
usual combination of a culinary artist with a sunny disposi- 
tion and a flair for athletics and art. If her cheerfulness 
doesn't help get you out of a fit of the blues, try some of her 
famous "French fries" when she's making them for a table 
party. 



CAROL ESTHER CHACE 

May Street, South Attleboro. W. A. A. 1, 
2, 3, Hockey 1, 2, 3, Baseball 2, Basketball 1. 
Scouts 1. Associate member Dramatic Club. 

"She Rafael's banner again unfurls." 

"....And unto some are given three talents." 
Children love Carol as an understanding teacher; acquaint- 
ances admire her as a promising artist, whose ability is always 
at the service of those struggling with room decorations or 
posters; and intimates value her as an unassuming friend. 




53 



1933 ALPHA 




DOROTHY PEARL COLBY 

25 Peck Street, Attleboro. W. A. A. 1, 2, 
W. A. A. Board 2. Class Treasurer 1, 2, 3. 

"She's all my fancy painted her; 
She's lovely; she's divine." 

One would not expect one with so innocent a look to be the 
competent business woman who has ably managed the finan- 
cial affairs of our class for these past three years. She spends 
her leisure wisely — crocheting. 



HELEN MARY CONNELL 

Hersey Street, Hingham. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. 
Scouts 1, 2, 3. Bowling 1. 

"The one that loves and laughs must sure do well." 

Quiet at times, Helen occasionally bubbles over; when she 
does, her shower of laughter becomes most contagious. In 
dramatization, she has given us many surprises. Miss Moffitt 
has said that no Romeo could resist the plea of Juliet as por- 
trayed by our Helen. 





HELEN BURTON DAVIS 

116 Briggs Street, Taunton. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. 

"Serene and contented, she goes her way, 
And cares not what the world may say." 

Ssh! Don't tell this to those who are searching for new 
hobbies — Helen tells us that her new hobby is "cats". She 
is also an enthusiastic gardener. Remember that bag of 
soil that was carried all the way to Taunton in the rain? 



54 



CLASSES 



ROLANDE ANITA DIONNE 

41 Brook Street, Rehoboth. French Club 1, 2, 3. 
Garden Club 1, 2. K. P. Club 3. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. 
Hockey 1, 2, 3, Volley Ball 2, 3. 

"Mine is a secret land where spring 
And sunset clouds cease wandering." 

Rolande's tireless energy found two absorbing outlets 
among college activities; enthusiastically interested in French 
Club, she contributed much of her own French vivacity to 
it; Woodward's newsy bulletin board benefited much from 
her originality. 





ALICE DROHAN 

527 Main Street, Brockton. W. A. A. 1, 2, 
Baseball 2. Day Student Council 1, 2, 3. 

"She lives on the sunny side and she would have 
you all come over with her." 

Our giggling crooner, Alice, is considered the prize story- 
teller of our class, and, may we add, she has never taken a 
train home later than 3:45. Alice is a great advocate of 
wise use of leisure — just come down to the commuters' room 
in her 'spares' and you'll find her either busily eating or mer- 
rily talking. 



MILDRED MARGARET FERGUSON 

30 James Street, New Bedford. Kindergarten 
Primary Club 2, 3, Pres. 3. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 
Hockey 1, 2, 3, Baseball 1, 2, 3. 

"My heart is a tumult of song 
And a torrent of wild wings shaking free." 

Mildred has found her true field of work. We can testify 
that when we see her with small children. The understanding 
heart that she displays then, carries over into her daily re- 
lations with every person she meets. And — she is also "mark- 
ed" by her irrepressible giggle that has stirred many a class 
from an impending nap. 




55 



1933 ALPHA 




BERTHA ANNE FITZPATRICK 

93 Main Street, Foxboro. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. 
Garden Club 2, 3. Glee Club 3. K. P. 3. 

"Gay good nature sparkles in her eyes 
As she doeth little kindness which others leave 
undone." 

This member of the jolly trio of room 17 is always associated 
with orange boxes and chickens. Her co-operation (?) with 
Mr. Huffington in his class work made her most outstanding. 
Even after three years we are still attempting to determine 
the color of Bertha's hair. We ask you, is it black or is it 
brown? 



SADIE FLEISHMAN 

603 Washington Street, Quincy. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3. 

"In her brain 

She hath strange places crammed with observa- 
tions, 
The which she vents." 

"Suds" is blessed with the gift of optimism; she always 
believes — or hopes — she has the right answer! And, whether 
or no, she bobs up serenely. "Modern Youth" — that's 
"Suds"! Ready to take a shot at anything! May her shin- 
ing armor never fail her; may her golden helmet never be 
bowed! 





HELEN LOUISE FOYE 

17 Bright Street, Brockton. Normal Offering 
1, 3. Campus Comment 2. K. P. 3. 

"And still they gazed, and still the wonder grew, 
That one small head could carry all she knew." 

Helen, if ever you should change your mind, (for wise 
people often do) and decide to try your luck at Shakes- 
pearian drama, you'll find us in the front row fully confident 
of a good performance. 



56 



CLASSES 



ISABEL DOROTHY GABRIEL 

79 Elm Street, Quincy. Day Student Council 
1. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, Volley Ball 2, Tenniquoit 2. 
Topics of the Day 3. Class Editor of Normal 
Offering 3. 

"A dancing shape, an image gay, 
To haunt, to startle, and waylay." 

She's "Izzie" to us, a name thoroughly in keeping with her 
merry grin. If that soubriquet isn't enough to make her 
distinctive, look for a windblown bob — one of the few sur- 
viving in this era of long hair. If you still can't find her, 
go over to the gym any noon when dancing is going on. With 
these hints your search is certain to be successful, and you're 
bound to be entertained! 





JEANETTE EVELYN GOFF 

Maple Street, Rehoboth. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 
Hockev 1, Basketball 1, 2, Tenniquoit 1, 2, 3, 
Volley Ball 1, 2. Baseball 1, 2. Dancing 1. 

"I would that my tongue could utter 
The thoughts that arise in me." 

Sitting back in her own corner, Jeanette lets the talk go 
all around her, seldom saying anything, but we know she's 
listening. See how her eyes light up when the conversation 
swings toward sports! 



ALICE LOUISE GUY 

30 Mount Pleasant Street, Plymouth. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3. Hockey 1, 2, 3. Track 1, 2. Baseball 
1, 2. Basketball 1. Topics of the Day 3. 

"There's only one proof of ability — action." 

We became acquainted with Louise as soon as the hockey 
season started early in the fall. Could she run down that 
hockey field! We soon found that she was to excel in all 
our athletics. Besides gym, one other subject is a favorite 
with Louise; often she is seen "among the minerals", busily 
engaged in copying charts. Let's hope she may make use 
of this information in explaining the composition of Plymouth 
Rock to future citizens of the United States! 




57 



1933 ALPHA 




ALICE ADELINE HADRO 

37 Clark Street, Easthampton. Topics of Day 
Club 2, 3. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. Basketball 1, 2. 
Hockey 1, 3. Baseball 1, 2. 

"Laughing at this, laughing at that, 
No one knows what she's laughing at." 

Remember how Alice would say at 7:30 on Friday nights 
that she was not going to the socials, and how you'd see her, 
at 8:00, signing out "gym"? 

This active, enthusiastic girl from Easthampton is good 
company almost always — but not before vacations, when she 
collects schedules and time tables, and begins to talk "trains", 
even in her sleep muttering— "Can I make the five o'clock?" 



JEANNETTE FAIRBANKS HAWES 

590 Broad Street, East Weymouth. Bowling 
1, 2. Baseball 1, 2. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. Topics 
of Day 2, 3. 

"I ride, on the mountain tops, I ride." 

Hawesie is blessed in that she has a sense of humor which 
she generously shares with us, and a serene easy-going manner 
which doesn't conceal an efficient and clear-sighted nature. 
Jeannette's hobby is doing cross word puzzles, and she can 
solve any puzzle in the Quincy Patriot Ledger. 





RETA LOUISE HOCKENBERRY 

85 Marsden Street, Springfield. Glee Club 
1, 2, 3. Choir 1, 2, 3. Scouts 2, 3. Kindergarten 
Primary Club 3. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. Baseball 1, 2. 
Volley Ball 1, 2. Dormitory Council 2. 

'A countenance in which did meet 
Sweet records, promises as sweet." 

One day a freshman needed cheering, for she was lonely. 
Everyone she met spoke briefly, and went on, not knowing 
how she craved companionship. That same day a sophomore 
received sad news in a letter. Her heart yearned to tell 
her trouble to some one who would sympathize. Down the 
hall a junior was puzzling alone over a problem. Advice was 
what she sought. That night they all met at Reta's door. 



58 



CLASSES 



MARJORIE ADA HUNKEN 

123 County Street, Attleboro. W. A. A. 1, 2. 
Vice-President of Class 3. 

"To know her is to love her 
And to admire her forever." 

Naturalness, frankness, and individuality best express our 
blonde and sophisticated Marge. Wherever she is, she is 
sure to be poised. Anyone who doubts it should have seen 
her in class meetings. 





HELENE DOLORES JOHNSON 

66 Hamilton Street, Wollaston. W. A. A. 1, 2, 
3. Hockey 1, 2, 3., Dancing 1. French Club 
2, 3. Glee Club 1, 2, 3. Scouts 1. 

"Her air had a meaning, 
Her movements a grace." 

A variety of interests must be responsible for that poise 
and self-possession which we always associate with Helene. 
Add to this a more than usual amount of "chic" and attrac- 
tiveness — and you have the open secret of her popularity. 



MARJORIE PRISCILLA KEITH 

525 Cottage Street, New Bedford. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3. Campus Comment 3. 

"She smiled at all the world 
And all the world smiled back." 

Such popularity as Marjorie has with her classmates must 
be deserved or it could not have stood the strain of three 
years' intimacy. All good things must eventually come to 
those who share in a secret as valuable as that of retaining 
friendship! 




59 



1933 ALPHA 




YVONNE THELMA KELSEY 

33 Nye Avenue, Brockton. W. A. A. 1, 2.' 
Kindergarten Primary Club 3. 

"Looks are deceiving, 
There's the humor of it." 

The critical person looks at Yvonne and says "nippy", 
and she is! She's nice; she's ice; she's pep; she's peppery; 
she's yes and then again she's no. Who can name the real 
Yvonne? 



IDA BERNICE KIMBALL 

104 Leyfred Terrace, Springfield. W.A.A. 1, 2, 3. 
Scouts 1, 2, 3. 

"The mildest manner and the gentlest heart." 

Although Ida has been with us throughout our years at 
College, few have had opportunity to really know her. Her 
quiet way and sweet smile have won many friends. Her 
style and dress, so neat and dainty, are characteristics which 
make her distinctly individual. 






PHYLLIS GRACELEY LAMM 



30 Main St., Hull. 
Camera Club 3. 



W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, Hockey 1, 



"I fancy life a silver tide 
With not a wave to ripple there." 

Phyllis heads the list of that popular set of people to whom 
life is just a "bowl of cherries". Always gay, she needs no 
introduction to any social group. — "And so on far into the 
night" applies to her enthusiasms, for Phyllis will be remember- 
ed as one of the few radio owners in Woodward. Ed Wynn 
and the Lucky Strike dance orchestra (who came on long 
after blinks) were her lullabies. 



60 



CLASSES 



BARBARA FRENCH LIBBEY 

283 North Street, North Weymouth. Baseball 
1, Hockey 1. Bowling 1. Topics of the Day Club 
3. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. Library Club 2, 3. 

"The joy of youth and health her eyes displayed, 
And ease of heart her every look convey'd." 

Barbara is sincere, whole-hearted, and happy, and more 
than that — when Barbara is happy, everyone else is, too. 
She is our loyal athletic supporter, for though she doesn't 
often participate, she is sure to be there to cheer to the last 
goal. One sport she does indulge in frequently, and whole- 
heartedly — that is eating. Perhaps that explains her ex- 
travagant good humor. 





EVELYN SHIRLEY LINCOLN 

263 Plain Street, Campello. Kindergarten- 
Primary Club 3. 

"It was you cast over me the spell of music." 

If you are a lover of Debussy, Evelyn has the exquisite 
touch which promises to satisfy your yearnings for good 
music. She has shown this by contributions drawn from 
her studies at the New England Conservatory of Music and 
from her previous teaching experience. 



BERNICE LUCEY 



156 Grafton Street, Brockton. 
Golf 1, Baseball 2. 



W. A. A. 1, 3. 



"On with the dance, let joy be unconfined." 

Bernice is a sweet girl with a bewitching dimple, a come- 
hither smile, and a charming personality. Her greatest hobby 
is — keeping her notebooks up to date? In fact when a note- 
book is due, Bernice is rushing around with her loose-leaf 
pages, trying to make much out of nothing. As for sport, 
she is certainly some fullback on the hockey team; she stands 
on the field with her pal, singing songs. 




61 



1933 ALPHA 




ALICE JOHANNA MADDEN 

23 Kingman Avenue, Brockton. 

"A quiet girl you think you see, 
Your thought is right concerning me." 

Oh, Alice, do you practice by the sea to gain that resonance 
of tone so successful in the demonstration room? Is it because 
you seldom speak, or because when you do, you say something 
worthwhile, that you command our attention? 



HAZEL MABEL MAXIM 

103 Pearl Street, Middleboro. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. 
Garden Club 2, 3. K. P. 2, 3. Hockey 1, 2, 3. 
Baseball 2, 3. Choir 1, 2. Glee Club 1, 2, 3. 

"Many a good thing comes in a small package" 

Hazel is little, but she has pep, vim, and vigor enough to 
make up for any lack of inches. Experience has taught her 
that objective lessons have great value. We hope the store- 
keepers are generous, Hazel, when you start your career. 





ELSIE LILIAN MAXWELL 



Main Street, Assinippi. 
1. Garden Club 2. 



W. A. A. 1,2, 3. Scouts 



"This happiness a habit is 
For life is what we make it." 

Some people have to laugh at their own jokes, or at least 
give a cue as to when to laugh, but this is not true of Elsie. 
She is wise and witty, and has helped us out of many a tight 
place in reading class. But oh! that blush. It was always 
beautiful, but sometimes inconvenient. Ask her. 



62 



CLASSES 



ALICE AILEEN McGRATH 

206 Middle Street, East Weymouth. W. A. A. 
3. 

"Thou, silent friend, dost tease us out of thought." 

We fear the blustery winters of Vermont must have been 
hard on this young lassie; for she prefers to sit by a radiator 
and sip her tea and eat delectable sandwiches. For those of 
you who may be curious, ask her to explain her complicated 
series of poses. You will certainly find this mode of amuse- 
ment quite entertaining. 





DOROTHY MILDRED MENDELSON 

463 Crescent Street, Brockton. 

"Her eyes as stars of twilight fair; 
Like twilight, too, her dusky hair." 

Dot needed no introduction to Thespis when she met him 
in History of Ed. Being so ardent an exponent of the Thes- 
pian art saved her from remembering that name for an exam. 



ELINOR HARRIETT MEYER 

49 Eddy Street, North Attleboro. Glee Club 
1, 2. Choir 1, 2. Scouts 1, 2, 3, Captain 3. 
W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, Head of Health 3. 

"To wake the soul of thy tender strokes of art, 
To raise the genius and to mend the heart." 

Elinor's middle name is "hustle". How she manages to 
get everything done is an inside secret of her own — We others 
might consult her! We hope her nonsense hasn't caused 
too many gray hairs among the faculty! 




63 



1933 ALPHA 




HELEN FINLAYSON MORRIS 

37 Pearl Street, Quincy. W. A. A. 3. 

"Speak gently, 'tis a little thing." 

Helen did not join us until our third year at S. T. C, yet 
she has become a pleasant addition to our class. We all 
appreciate the many times when she has come laden with 
sombrero and soup-and-fish to eke out a costume for our 
famous characterizations. 



MARION ELIZABETH MORSE 

Bay Road, Sharon. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, Hockey 

1, 3, Volley Ball 2, Interpretive Dancing 1, Archery 

2. Scouts 1, 2, 3. Hobby Club 2, 3. 

"Her life, exempt from public haunt, 
Finds tongues in trees, books in running brooks, 
Sermons in stones, and good in everything." 

In her solitude we suspect Marion had found freedom in a 
loving study of the poet's view of nature. 





MARY ROSE NOCIVELLI 

65 Atherton Street, Somerville. W. A. A. 1, 
2, 3, Golf 2, Tenniquoit 2, Hockey 1, Volley Ball 2. 

"Kind hearts are more than coronets." 

There is an "unruffledness" about Mary that is soothing 
to us more distracted mortals. Heavy history assignments, 
long train trips, — nothing seems to bother her. If we should 
see Mary perturbed we would feel that an integral part of 
her charm had been lost. 



64 



CLASSES 



ALICE MARGUERITE NORTON 

11 Annis Court, Brockton. 

"Grieving is a folly, 
Come, let's all be jolly." 

At school we're not quite sure of "Al." It was reported 
that she was once discovered peacefully napping in the Day 
Students' room, but we have never seen her when she wasn't 
right "up on her toes." 

We have our suspicions as to the way she spends her sum- 
mer vacations because in September her sun tan turns us all 
green with envy. 




HELEN EILEEN O'HALLORAN 

490 Broad Street, East Weymouth. W. A. A. 3. 

"She that was fair and never proud, 
Had tongue at will and yet not loud." 

We suggest a new activity for W. A. A. — horsebacking, 
so that Helen may have a chance to demonstrate that ability 
she acquired at the Normal School in Johnson, Vermont. 



NATALIE VIOLET PETERSON 

East Brewster. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. Scouts 2. 
Topics of the Day Club 3. Hobby Club 3. 

"True as the needle to the pole, 
Or as the dial to the sun." 

We wonder if all Cape-Codders are like Nat and as easily 
distinguished by their walk. Does it register? Nat is a 
living proof that a head in the air does not denote conceit; 
she is just facing the world with her chin up. 




65 



1933 ALPHA 



MARY AGNES RALEIGH 

749 Montello St., Brockton. Orchestra 2, 3. 

"Of all those arts in which the wise excel, 
Nature's chief masterpiece is talking well." 

Mary and her violin are closely associated in the minds of 
all who know her. B5 was very happy to welcome her to its 
membership last year when she decided upon teaching in 
place of her musical career which she had been pursuing pre- 
viously. We all ask, "Is there any subject upon which Mary 
can not shed enlightenment?" And how many hours a day 
does she devote to the perusal of the dictionary? 



MIRIAM ELIZABETH ROBERTS 

44 Concord Street, Rockland. Hockey 1, 2, 3. 
Baseball 2. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. Soccer 2. 

'All compliments to her are trite." 

Mim is another of those moderns who can successfully 
combine scholarship and athletics without diminishing by 
one particle her capacity for social enjoyment. Her many 
trips, or perhaps we should say balks, in "O'le Chief Pontiac" 
have made her quite well known about school. 





RUTH BERNADINE SHEA 

398 Plain Street, Rockland. W. A. A. 3. Day 
Student Council 1. 

'"Twas her thinking of others made you think of 
her." 

We all know and appreciate the fact that Ruth is an opti- 
mist whose motto seems to be, "Never trouble trouble 'till 
trouble troubles you". But do we always stop to think of 
how often she goes out of her way to assume the troubles of 
her friends? 



66 



CLASSES 



SIGNE SELINDA SIITONEN 

89 Broadway Street, Quincy. Choir 3. Hock- 
ey 1, 2, 3. Baseball 1, 2, 3. 

"She opens her mouth with wisdom, 
And the law of kindness is on her tongue." 

Smiling "Sig" Siitonen! She simply captivates our hearts 
with her sunny smile and sweet soprano. The natives of 
Nantucket used good judgment in naming her "Bubbles" as 
did Miss Moffitt in calling her "a little ray of sunshine". As 
a sunshine spreader she surely heads the list — except when you 
question her as to her middle name. "What's in a name, 'Sig'?" 





ETHEL WESTON SMITH 

Main Street, South Hanson. W. A. A. 3. 

"Her presence lends its warmth and cheer 
To all who come before it." 

Ethel is a comfortable person to have around. She has her 
troubles like us all but they check her cheery nature only 
temporarily. Soon the quick smile is flashing and somehow 
everyone's troubles have disappeared. 



HARRIET LUCILLE SMITH 

927 High Street, Fall River. W. A. A. 
Baseball 2. Day Student Council 1, 2. 



2, 3, 



"Her ways are those of pleasantness, and all her 
paths are peace." 

Don't you like people who are different? Chum with 
Harriet. Charming? Yes, but not in the "prosy" sense. 
She so radiates gentleness that you suddenly realize that she 
has quietly slipped into your closest circle of friends. 




67 



1933 ALPHA 




RUTH OLGA SWANSON 

10 First Street, Brockton. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. 
Science Club 1. Kindergarten-Primary 2, 3, 
Secretary 2. 

"Not too serious, — Not too gay 
We love her for her smile — her look — her way." 

There's a wicked twinkle in her eye when she announces 
softly that a test is in the air. We know she's teasing but 
we do get excited and then how she laughs, the minx. 



MILDRED AURELIA TILTON 

Skiff Avenue, Vineyard Haven. W. A. A. 1, 2, 
3. Basketball 1, 2. Volley Ball 2. Glee Club 
3. Topics-of-the-Day 3. 

"I never knew her loveliness 
Until she smiled on me." 

Silence is most audible in Mildred's corner and yet when 
she speaks, her husky tones shatter it meaningfully. Her 
pleasure is in sports, music, and a good time, while her dis- 
likes are negligible in number, but decided. Ask her about 
slow-moving Cape trains if you don't believe it! 





MARGARET DORIS VICKERS 

437 Prescott Street, New Bedford. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3. Garden Club 2, 3. Scouts 1. Basket- 
ball 1. Hobby Club 2. 

"Forget not yet the tried intent 
Of such a truth as I have meant." 

The popularity of Margaret is self-evident at the beginning 
of class. The secret now we may tell, — she inevitably carries 
an extra supply of writing materials for the members of the 
class who just about arrive with the bell. 



68 



CLASSES 



MAE SYLVIA WILSON 

186 Oakland Avenue, Methuen. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3. Hockey 1, 2, 3. Baseball 1, 2. 

"I do wander everywhere, 
Swifter than the moon's sphere." 

Mae is a maid of many arts. In the summer she "waits" 
and in the winter she "goes". Her dramatization of an Indian 
lover is to be remembered as well as her famous family stories. 




Class Roll 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE 1934 



Abbott, Helen 
Alexander, Dorothy M 
Anderson, Olga 
Beach, Madeline . 
Beede, Ethel M. 
Bernier, Eva C. 
Bianchi, Sylvia A. 
Bliss, Phyllis E. . 
Boucher, Mildred C. 
Bowman, Mildred K. 
Brittan, Olive C. . 
Caswell, Madeline G. 
Clarner, Doris B. . 
Clausmeyer, Helen L. 
Coleman, Priscilla H. 
Crowley, Mary E. 
Cullen, Mary A. . 
Curley, Grace 
Darche, Eldora R. 
Davidian, Gladys A. 
Davis, Evelyn F. . 
Deplitch, Marion M. 
Dix, Barbara T. 
Drevinsky, Polly V. 
Dunlavy, Elisabeth W. 
Dymowska, Bertha 
Fenton, Alice L. . 
Ferris, Ruth K. 



77 



236 West St., Gardner 
214 Pine St., Holyoke 
. Box 3, Townsend Harbor 
56 Warren St., West Springfield 
41 Cowdrey Ave., Lynn 
143 Bridge St., North Weymouth 
. 220 Liberty St., Quincy 
4 Swindells St., Fall River 
36 Vaillencourt St., Taunton 
7 Court End Ave., Middleboro 
7 Parker St., Newton Centre 
26 Jackson St., Middleboro 
R. F. D. Swansea 
216 Temple St., West Roxbury 
30 Hussey St., Nantucket 
51 Ninth Ave., Haverhill 
55 Prospect St., Fall River 
North Central St., East Bridgewater 
. 20 Hazel St., Brockton 
36 Parker St., New Bedford 
Wellesley Farms 
366 Hood St., Fall River 
94 Beech Ave., Melrose 
14 Lane St., Middleboro 
109 Pine St., Wollaston 
20 Hector Road, Mattapan 
155 School St., Taunton 
33 Cowdrey Ave., East Lynn 



69 



1933 ALPHA 



Fisher, Miriam D. 
Ford, Virginia A. 
Freitas, Bessie T. 
Galipeau, Lucienne J. 
Gavin, Glenda G. 
Gillen, Edith A. . 
Ginnetty, Anna E. 
Godfrey, Elois 
Henriksen, Gunvor N. 
Henry, Ruth G. . 
Hixon, Dorothy N. 
Homer, Alice M. . 
Hough, Louise M. 
Johnson, Marie C. 
Kelly, Frances G. 
Kimball, Margaret 
Knox, Grace L. 
Koss, Ruth O. 
Larchar, Carolyn T. 
Leary, Elizabeth H. 
Leonard, Marie C. 
Levering, Mary E. 
Lewis, Ella K. 
Lindberg, Esther L. 
Lindstrom, Alice L. 
Lyman, Frances E. 
Magnant, Alice L. 
Mason, Dora B. . 
Mattson, Helen J 
McEnelly, Ethel . 
McHugh, Loretta M. 
McKee, Ruth J. . 
McKenna, Susan G. 
McMahon, Doris H. 
McManus, Margaret Z 
McMurdie, Olga J. E. 
Mitchell, Laura G. 
Molloy, Margaret M. 
Moran, Mary M. . 
Moren, Mildred . 
Morgan, Aileen 
Murray, Charlotte W. 
Nash, Marion E. . 
Nolan, Mildred A. 
Norton, Frances A. 
Olson, Alice E. 
Parker, Eleanor 
Pickens, Anna 
Reynolds, Dorothy M. 
Robie, Muriel E. 
Saley, Geraldine L. 
Sampson, Dorothy M. J. 
Sanford, Ruth A. . 
Shaffner, Emily L. 
Shaw, Dorothy M. 
Shea, Maureen M. 



113 North Central St., East Bridgewater 

542 Liberty St., Rockland 

7 Huttlestone Ave., Fairhaven 

513 Bay St., Taunton 

100 North St., Randolph 

West Main St., Merrimac 

58 Plain St., Randolph 

50 Shaw Road, Bridgewater 

37 Crown St., Milton 

19 Endicott St., Waltham 

4 Summit Ave., Melrose 

19 Clinton Ave., Brockton 

72 Franklin St., South Braintree 

. 83 Garfield St., Quincy 

3 Newburg St., Roslindale 

11 Parsons St., Newbury port 

29 Maple St., Easthampton 

77 River Road, Quincy 

356 High St., Webster 

154 Hanover St., Fall River 

22 Barry St., Brockton 

138 Boylston St., Brockton 

Riverside Ave., Pottersville 

. 86 Town Hill St., Quincy 

248 Grafton St., Brockton 

. 77 Slocum St., Acushnet 

79 East Squantum St., Atlantic 

941 Plymouth St., Bridgewater 

117 Winslow Ave., Norwood 

. 140 Woodlawn St., Lynn 

132 Broadway, Taunton 

Water St., Hingham 

165 Broadway, Taunton 

122 Pine St., Brockton 

37 Bay St., Taunton 

133 Manning St., Needham 

146 Adams St., Waltham 

58 Colby St., Haverhill 

9 Pleasantview Ave., Longmeadow 

. 142 Central Ave., Hyde Park 

284 Washington St., Haverhill 

20 Everett St., Arlington 

215 Vernon St., Norwood 

55 Everett St., Middleboro 

168 Main St., Amesbury 

39 Massasoit Road, North Weymouth 

299 Salem St., Bradford 

45 Stevens St., Stoneham 

1357 Broadway, Somerville 

Central St., Fayville 

264 Belmont Ave., Brockton 

23 Flansburg Ave., Dal ton 

294 Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill 

128 State St., Newburyport 

Huntington 

81 Church St., Chicopee Falls 



70 



CLASSES 



Sia, Vera M. 
Sizer, Ruth M. 
Smith, Olive 
Stafonwic, Anna M. 
Standish, Lillian 
Stromdahl, F. Elizabeth 
Taber, Ruth E. . 
Thibault, Nathalie I. 
Tobin, Constance B. 
Tosi, Louise E. 
Trulson, Bernice E. 
Wanelik, Marion R. 
West, Louise I. 
Westgate, Dorothy A. 
Young, Mildred S. 
Aherne, Charles F. 
Bartlett, Drexel A. 
Cadwell, Harvey G. 
Cameron, Kenneth A. 
Copeland, Chauncey J. 
Curley, Richard K. 
Dunn, Edward 
Fanning, Francis J. 
Glenn, John 
Hennessey, George W. 
MacDonald, Minot B. 
Mears, Hilton F. 
Moore, Simon H. . 
Morey, Joseph F. 
Peterson, Otto A. Jr., 
Smith, John J. 
Spracklin, Harry E. 
Sukeforth, Earle B. 
Teeling, Joseph D. 
Wood, Alfred L. . 



1083 Nantasket Ave., Hull 

24 Fairmount St., Melrose 

86 Whittier St., Springfield 

8 Oak Ave., Taunton 

Wareham St., Middleboro 

65 Bay View Ave., Lynn 

299 Washington St., Canton 

14 Court End Ave., Middleboro 

25 Winthrop Ave., Bridgewater 

281 Sandwich St., Plymouth 

90 Eliot St., Norwood 

16 Cottage St., Lynn 

North Pembroke 

43 General Cobb St., Taunton 

Scituate 

243 Birch St., North Abington 

107 South Ave., Whitman 

42 Summer St., Kingston 

51 Spooner St., North Plymouth 

548 South St., Bridgewater 

27 Spring St., East Bridgewater 

308 Main St., Bridgewater 

34 Forest St., Fall River 

66 Forest St., Whitman 

North Elm St., West Bridgewater 

594 Fourth St., South Boston 

52 Beckett Road, Belmont 

484 Main St., Bridgewater 

59 Cook St., East Bridgewater 

309 Seaver St., Stoughton 

100 Spooner St., North Plymouth 

13 Orange St., Chelsea 

27 Central St., East Bridgewater 

363 Walnut St., Bridgewater 

Plymouth St., Middleboro 




THE SYMBOLISM OF THE SCHOOL SEAL 
The lighted tower on the Administration Building is an emblem invariably associated 
with Bridgewater by those acquainted with the College. Its cheery brightness was more 
welcome and striking than ever one winter night as I was waiting in the cold for the auto- 
mobile in which I commute to school. Its clear, shining rays seemed to represent all that 
Bridgewater offers of guidance and leadership. 

Thus it came to me, the thought of using that lighted tower on the school seal as sym- 
bolic of our College. Doris Wit.d 



1933 ALPHA 




President 
Vice-President 
Treasurer 
Secretary 



Kenneth Murphy 

Velma Davis 

. Mary Campbell 

John Bates 



History 



Upon returning to Bridgewater Teachers College last fall as sophomores, we discovered 
that our responsibilities had increased. It now became our time-honored duty and sacred 
privilege to entertain and educate in part, the incoming class. Committees were organized 
and initiation was carried through successfully, with no harm done. 

When the freshmen were thus properly installed, our attention was focused upon the 
planning and executing of the annual Sophomore Social. Continuing as social creatures, 
we joined with the Juniors in giving the Sophomore-Junior Prom in January. It was 
declared a social and financial success. 

Not the least of our surmounted problems, for most of us at least, was the pleasant pass- 
ing of six weeks of intensive study in the training school. With this — may we call it bap- 
tismal? — training, we advanced a bit further in the teaching profession to prepare us for 
the path that lies ahead of us here at College. 

Plenty of participation in extra-curricular activities has prevented us from keeping our 
noses to the grindstone too much. 

John Bates 



72 



CLASSES 



Class Roll 



Adamowska, Mary A. 
Amoroso, Conceda O. 
Amsden, Madeline E. 
Anderson, Ruth P. 
Baldwin, Doris E. 
Bates, Emily S. 
Bearce, Dorothy W. 
Behan, Marion J. 
Berezin, Ida R. 
Bissonnet, Emma R. 
Bingle, Veronica D. 
Buelow, May C. . 
Burrill, Florence W. 
Burrill, Frances W. 
Campbell, Mary G. 
Carroll, Jane H. . 
Carter, Arlene W. 
Caruso, Josephine M. 
Chestna, Anne M. 
Cochrane, Virginia 
Cook, Claire A. 
Cushman, Marion E. 
Cushman, Mildred 
Davis, Velma E. . 
Deans, Mary E. . 
DiBartolomeo, Mary 
Doherty, Teresa E. 
Donahue, Alice T. 
Dupuis, Ellen A. . 
Ellis, Bertha L. 
Fair, Virginia M. . 
Feindel, Caroline T. 
Flynn, M. Rita . 
Foley, Alma E. 
Forrest, Mildred M. 
Fuller, Olive H. . 
Geiger, Madeline T. 
Giberti, Florence C. 
Gilligan, Ellen 
Gould, Ruth M. . 
Grade, Doris E. 
Grant, Grace A. . 
Guidoboni, Dolores 
Guilmartin, Alice J. 
Harlow, Wilma C. 
Haselgard, Eva D. 
Haslett, Thelma L. 
Hirtle, Esther M. 
Hofrerty, Kathleen M. 
Holbrook, Esther . 
Holmes, Eleanor M. 
Holmes, Patricia . 
Hosford, Olive M. 



483 South Front Street, New Bedford 
105 School Street, Quincy 
River Street, Brookfield 
27 Webster Street, Middleboro 
19 Everett Street, Middleboro 
Pratt Avenue, Somerset 
41 Laurel St., East Weymouth 
95 Pleasant St., Holbrook 
. 42 Chapel St., Norwood 
7 Madison St., Taunton 
19 Arthur St., West Lynn 

Furnace 

94 Fremont St., Bridgewater 

94 Fremont St., Bridgewater 

42 Church St., Bridgewater 

21 Grove St., Bridgewater 

14 Fiske Ave., East Weymouth 

47 Madison St., East Weymouth 

214 Plymouth St., Bridgewater 

. 29 Russell Park, Quincy 

. 48 Boyden St., Brockton 

37 Hale St., Bridgewater 

37 Hale St., Bridgewater 

Point Road, Marion 

. 50 South St., Plymouth 

22 Massachusetts Ave., Quincy 

5 State St., Taunton 

24 Railroad Ave., Norwood 

Holland 

O. Box 5, Chelmsford Center 

26 Calumet St., Wollaston 

26 Summer St., Wakefield 

53 Eleventh St., Fall River 

. 20 Adams St., Fall River 

48 Cottage St., Randolph 

19 Silver Road, Brockton 

66 Sagamore Ave., Quincy 

19 Hillside Ave., Middleboro 

135 South Main St., Middleboro 

47 Salem St., Rockland 

34 Sunnybank Road, Watertown 

16 Nahant St., Wakefield 

6 Suosso Lane, Plymouth 

15 Calumet St., Quincy 

34 South St., West Bridgewater 

87 Wheeler St., Gloucester 

. 913 Brockton Ave., Abington 

121 Taylor St., Wollaston 

95 Revere Road, Quincy 

282 School St., Whitman 

101 So. Washington St., Whitman 

448 School St., Webster 

Pleasant Valley, Amesbury 



73 



1933 ALPHA 



' Hultstrom, Harriet M. 
Hunt, Doris V. 
Jacobs, Grace A. 
Johnson, Edythe I 
Johnson, Elsa E. 
Joseph, Bertha C. 
Kelleher, Arlene A 
Kelly, Marie C. 
Kennedy, Edna L. 
Kidd, B. Irene 
Kidston, Hilda M. 
Kitson, Demetra 
LaGreca, Enes S. 
Lambe, Sadie A. 
Lawton, Ruth M. 
Lema, Alice . 
Leppala, Esther A 
Levow, Dorothy . 
Linehan, Helen R. 
Lloyd, Eileen W. 
Long, Hazel L. 
Lothrop, Marietta E. 
McCann, Dorothy H. 
McGinn, Helen J. 
McLaughlin, Mary E. 
Macfee, Jessie G. . 
Mannion, Ruth E. 
Martin, Christine M. 
Maynard, Elizabeth M 
Nimmo, Janet E. . 
Obshatkin, Helen E. 
Packard, Eleanor J. 
Paquin, Cheridah A. 
Parmenter, Jeanette W 
Pebler, Elizabeth T. 
Perkins, Cecelia 
Perry, Rose 
Pilote, Dorothea A. 
Portmore, Harriet H. 
Pray, Myrtle E. . 
Prescott, Hazel S. 
Renzi, Beatrice E. 
Rider, Ruth M. . 
Roberts, Mary E. 
Robinson, Dorothy E. 
Robinson, Helen W. 
Royster, Edna 
Ryan, Mary . 
Ryder, Phyllis M. 
Savage, Alice A. 
Scott, Marion A. 
Shea, Ellen M. 
Shea, Mary F. 
Sheehan, Arlene 
Smith, Celia H. 
Smith, Hazel E. 



64 Eliot St., Norwood 

30 Congress St., Stoneham 

137 East Water St., Rockland 

23 Appleton St., Watertown 

3 Kellock Ave., Brockton 

34 Forrest Ave., Brockton 

12 Eleventh Ave., Haverhill 

396 Hahatan St., Norwood 

132 Somerset Ave., Taunton 

17 Berley St., Lynn 

15 Locust St., Merrimac 

58 Charles St., Haverhill 

187 High St., Taunton 

1673 Commercial St., East Weymouth 

Old Country Road, North Westport 

. 108 Standish Ave., Plymouth 

61 Kent St., West Quincy 

102 Rotch St., New Bedford 

. 18 Lexington Ave., Bradford 

151 Chestnut St., Fairhaven 

3 Lincoln St., Middleboro 

11 Central Square, West Bridgewater 

122 Garfield Ave., Chelsea 

99 Cottage St., Lynn 

. 48 School St., Randolph 

41 Avalon Ave., Quincy 

13 Hosmer St., Everett 

5 Branch St., Mansfield 

Greenfield Meadows, Greenfield 

883 Southern Artery, Quincy 

19 Clinton St., Taunton 

22 Elm Ave., Fairhaven 

. South Main St., Middleboro 

Pine St., Eastondale 

. 19 Vassal St., Wollaston 

121 Union St., Franklin 

944 Somerset Ave., Taunton 

245 Temple St., Whitman 

2 Solon St., Wellesley 

232 Washington St., Weymouth 

Curve St., Carlisle 

361 Rantoul St., Beverly 

44 First St., Dalton 

8 Center St., Provincetown 

190 North Main St., Middleboro 

Robinson St., Littleton 

177 Boylston St., Brockton 

9 Highland Place, Plymouth 

423 School St., Stoughton 

. 153 Elm St., Quincy 

6 Mineral St., Reading 

60 Pearl St., East Bridgewater 

240 Center St., South Groveland 

. 37 Albion St., Brockton 

190 North Main St., Middleboro 

285 Front St., Weymouth 



74 



CLASSES 



Smith, Lemira C. . 
Souza, Alice R. 
Sprague, Doris M. 
Stenberg, Doris R. 
Stockbridge, Barbara 
Sullivan, Esther M. 
Sullivan, Ruth 
Tripp, Anna L. 
Tripp, Audrey L. . 
Turner, Beatrice M. 
Tutty, Isabel 
VanCampen, Ruth 
Walker, Irene E. . 
Wormwood, Hazel R. 
Bates, John S. 
Brewer, Harold H. 
Callahan, Charles E. 
Castle, James K. . 
Champagne, Francis O 
Cook, Raymond F. 
Coombs, Kenneth C. 
Gregory, Samuel F. 
Hancock, Robert A. 
Higgins, George E. 
Hill, Paul D. 
Jacobsen, George A. 
Jones, George A. . 
Kiernan, Owen B. 
Mahoney, Harold J. 
Meyers, David 
Morris, George E. 
Murphy, Kenneth F. 
Rose, Carlton, 
Ross, Donald E. 
Welch, Donald T. 



16 Courtland Street, Middleboro 

. 35 Oak St., Middleboro 

464 High St., Bridgewater 

18 Putnam St., Quincy 

104 Summer St., Maynard 

. 118 Second St., Medford 

6 Harding Ave., Bradford 

Gi fiord Road, North Westport 

Pine Hill Road, Westport 

399 High St., Dalton 

3 Pearl St., North Weymouth 

16 Prospect St., Taunton 

R. F. D. 1, Attleboro 

P. O. Box 41, West Groton 

Pratt Ave., Somerset 

R. F. D. 1, Great Barrington 

91 Block St., Abington 

311 Beacon St., Boston 

65 First St., Raynham 

11 Savory Ave., Sagamore 

95 Orange St., Nantucket 

121 East Main St., Avon 

P. O. Box 43, Franklin 

368 Crescent Ave., Chelsea 

Rahwav Road, Burlington 

. 296 West Main St., Avon 

169 Hollis St., Braintree 

9 North St., Randolph 

196 Spruce St., North Abington 

56 Nelson St., Dorchester 

663 Locust St., Fall River 

Lambert's Cove, Vineyard Haven 

6 Centennial St., Plymouth 

. 54 Townsend Ave., Braintree 

5 Crowell St., Middleboro 



75 



1933 ALPHA 



FRESH MEM 




President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Stephen Lovett 

Priscilla Walker 

Ruth Bumpus 

Ruth Cronin 



History 



The upperclassmen had a way of initiating us, the class of 1936, so there was no mis- 
taking the fact that we were freshmen. 

Very early in the year we had an opportunity to meet everyone at the Acquaintance 
Social. A little later, we had a freshman party which was quite successful. Almost every- 
one in the class attended and met one another informally. 

In the fall the men had a sack race while the girls participated in the Freshmen Olympics 
for their part in the sports. 

Under Miss Pope's leadership the usual round of freshman teas was given in the Library 
during Book Week. 

Class elections were held in December. The leaders chosen were given the oppor- 
tunity to exercise their executive and creative abilities in planning the Freshman Social, 
held on St. Patrick's Day. How appropriate! 

Have you noticed how many freshmen have taken part in chapel programs this year? 
This augurs well for the future participation of our class in college activities. We'll prove 
that "Green means Growth"! 

Ruth Bumpus 



76 



CLASSES 



Class Roll 

1932-33 



Albret, Barbara H. 
Anderson, Elsie R. I. 
Appleford, Eleanor W 
Bearse, Dorothy S. 
Bumpus, Ruth V 
Carr, Alice M. 
Cassidy, Rita H. . 
Chiros, Marguerite M 
Collier, Catherine C. 
Collins, Marie E. . . 
Coulter, Carol L. . 
Gronin, Ruth M. . 
Cruice, Anna M. . 
Cusick, Elizabeth A. 
Dacey, Isabell R. . 
Davis, Ruth M. . 
Dean, Nathalie P. 
Dearborn, Marguerite M. 
DeLory, Norma J. 
Dillon, Florence S. 
Drinkwater, Anna L. 
Eyre, Muriel L. 
Esau, Phyllis 
Farr, Carol V. 
Faunce, Rebecca B. 
Flaherty, Ruth E. 
Flynn, Dorothy 
Freeman, Mary A. 
French, Gertrude . 
Gilliatt, Marguerite 
Gilmartin, Catherine 
Golding, Charlotte 
Graham, Catherine D. 
Greenwood, Barbara L 
Griffiths, Carol W. 
Hall, Harriet 
Halloran, Alice E. 
Heyworth, Pearl B. 
Hollenbeck, Marjorie S 
Houde, Anna M. . 
Imhof, Rosamond L. 
Ireland, Cordelia . 
Jennings, Ella 
Johnson, Adelaide W. 
Johnson, Elizabeth M. 
Johnson, Elsa D. . 
Johnson, Katherine L. 
Jones, Frances Doris 
Kelleher, Doris 
Kennedy, Phyllis I. 
Kosmaler, Arline C. 



25 Lincoln St., Milton 
7 Emerald St., East Bridgewater 

29 Burton Ave., Whitman 

Main St., Cotuit 

156 Clifton Ave., Brockton 

30 Janvrin Ave., Revere 

101 Magazine St., Cambridge 

65 Court St., Whitman 

South St., Foxboro 

929 Southern Artery, Quincy 

104 So. Franklin St., Brookville 

. 51 Glenwood Ave., Pittsfield 

19 Farrington St., Brockton 

. 147 Kent St., Brookline 

66 Putnam St., East Weymouth 

. 99 Upland Road, Quincy 

26 Rich St., Waltham 
293 Summer St., Somerville 

. 54 Stanton St., Rockland 
12 Georgia Road, South Weymouth 
, 217 Winthrop St., Taunton 
57 Savoie St., Fall River 
45 Bryant Ave., East Milton 
Tilley St., Granby 
105 North Ave., No. Abington 
30 Tapley St., Lynn 
. 90 Webb St., Weymouth 

17 Nursery St., Whitman 

18 Wright St., Stoneham 
Wellfleet 

96 Grover Ave., No. Quincy 

44 Tremont St., Campello 

28 Granite St., Whitinsville 

15 Linden St., Whitinsville 

40 Cocassett St., Foxboro 

Hospital Road, Concord 

197 Bruce St., Lawrence 

1255 Wilson Road, Fall River 

10 Third St., Onset 

9 Track St., Brockton 

333 Groveland St., Abington 

Orleans 

. Burr Parkway Wareham 

Bay St., North Easton 

11 North Ames St., Lynn 

14 Jackson St., Attleboro 

R. F. D. 1, Attleboro 

137 Blackstone St., Fall River 

12 Eleventh Ave., Haverhill 

R. F. D. 16, East Taunton 

25 Nelson St., Webster 



77 



1933 ALPHA 



Kovalchuk, Helen 
LaFavor, Evelyn . 
Lajoie, Pauline D. 
Larson, Alice E. 
LeBourdais, Marie M. 
Leino, Ida 
Lane, Rachel J. 
Leonard, Helen L. 
Look, Dorothy M. 
Ludden, Bernice 
Mahady, Marguerite 
Mapp, Zylpha O. . 
Marentz, Isabelle . 
Martini, Olga 
Mattos, Gladys G. 
Mathewson, Hazel M. 
McGovern, Helen C. 
McKee, Anna C. . 
Medeiros, Mary E. 
Moitoza, Evelyn M. 
Moore, Muriel L. . 
Moriarty, Marjorie M. 
Moura, Eliza C. 
Murray, Mary M. 
Murrill, Alice I. . 
Norton, Dorothy E. 
Noyes, R. Arline . 
Ordway, Alice N. . 
Osborne, Mary E. 
Pentikainen, Sylvia A. 
Perkins, Eunice H. 
Prario, Virginia S. 
Puffer, Ruth H. . 
Quigley, Florence E. 
Reilly, Catherine M. 
Reynolds, Ernestine W 
Richwagen, Ellen E. 
Rittershaus, Barbara J 
Rochelle, Alice R. 
Ross, Kathryn M. 
Russell, Helen I. . 
Salo, Mary 
Santos, Mary A. . 
Sawyer, Althea P. 
Sawyer, Rita I. 
Schmalz, Barbara J. 
Shatz, Frances 
Small, Helen . 
Smith, Barbara 
Smith, Marjorie E. 
Smolski, Annie 
Stein, Sadye 
Sturtevant, Josephine F 
Surinski, Anne 
Thorley, Esther H. 
Tierney, Mary E. 



70 Green St., Rockland 

42 Sixteenth Ave., Haverhill 

Nursery St., Whitman 

53 Martin St., Attleboro 

271 Plymouth St., No. Abington 

P. O. Box 2, Sagamore 

15 Cushing St., Amesbury 

177 Winthrop St., Taunton 

Laurel Ave., Oak Bluffs 

. 45 Thaxter Ave., Abington 

80 Concord St., Rockland 

74 Littlefield St., Avon 

. 19 Main St., Quincy 

411 Broadway St., Somerville 

74 Liberty St., East Taunton 

71 Pennybrook Road, West Lynn 

13 Charles St., North Abington 

Main St., Hingham 

5 Grant St., Taunton 

56 West Weir St., Taunton 

17 Garrison Ave., West Somerville 

454 Hillside Ave., Holyoke 

398 Bolton St., New Bedford 

222 Lowell St., Fall River 

615 Market St., Rockland 

Main St., Somerset 

10 Summer St., Groveland 

9 Francis St., Groveland 

. R. F. D., Rockland 

Carver 

13 Parsons St., Newburyport 

Highland St., Marshfield 

463 Pleasant St., East Bridgewater 

24 West Weir St., Taunton 

488 Salem St., Rockland 

41 Columbus Ave., Northampton 

60 Rosemary St., Needham 

Canterbury St., Hingham 

. 28 Leonard St., Foxboro 

Edgewood St., Gloucester 

67 Edison Parkway St., Quincy 

. 17 Ethel Ave., Peabody 

19 Center St., Provincetown 

293 Squantum St., Atlantic 

Winthrop Place, Taunton 

177 Colburn St., East Dedham 

10 Fowler St., Quincy 

Woburn St., Lexington 

123 Mt. Pleasant Ave., Gloucester 

143 Pacific St., Rockland 

20 Folan Ave., Norwood 

61 Verchild St., Quincy 

25 Union Ave., East Weymouth 

68 Spring St., Bridgewater 

Circuit St., West Hanover 

. 45 Dover St., Worcester 



78 



CLASSES 



Turner, Dorothy S.' 
Turner, Ruth D. . 
Walsh, Isabelle D. 
Washburn, Gretchen 
Wasserman, Elizabeth 
Waterhouse, Mary I. 
Westgate, Dorothy 
Whitty, Evelyn F. 
Wolfson, Thelma H. 
Woodward, Dorothy E 

Baptiste, Herman C. 
Bertrand, Aloysius 
Blair, Clarence N. 
Bradbury, Wilfred K. 
Bradshaw, Clement R. 
Casey, Paul B. 
Cohen, Melvin S. . 
Cunniff, Bernard F. 
Goldstein, Meyer . 
Johnson, Everett A. 
Halzel, Lawrence 
Kelly, Daniel 
Kennedy, Francis V. 
Lovett, Stephen . 
Lynch, Clement 
Mclnnes, Joseph R. 
Michelson, Thomas L. 
Moran, Francis M. 
Morrison, Gordon J. 
Nay, Marshall W. 
Nickerson, Raymond O 
Nolan, John E. 
Nugent, William A. 
Olenick, Paul F. . 
Pitcher, Damon W. 
Riley, Samuel G. . 
Rounseville, Howard 
Szematowicz, Joseph P 
Taitz, Emanuel 
True, John E. 
Whitcomb, Charles L. 



242 Titicut St., State Farm 

163 Forest St., Melrose 

116 Laureston St., Brockton 

66 South St., Bridgewater 

39 Hodges Ave., Taunton 

4 East Main St., Webster 

37 Courtland St., Middleboro 

11 Everett St., Middleboro 

358 Broadway St., Chicopee Falls 

. 92 Everett St., Lawrence 

75 Crapo St., New Bedford 

14 Main St., North Grafton 

56 Tremont St., South Braintree 

. 497 June St., Fall River 

. 12 Walnut St., Taunton 

124 Central St., Rockland 

157 Intervale St., Roxburv 

110 East Water St., Taunton 

914 Plymouth St., Bridgewater 

. 156 South St., Avon 

31 Deering Road, Mattapan 

614 Maple St., Fall River 

77 Robinson St., West Lynn 

455 South St., Bridgewater 

493 Main St., Bridgewater 

80 Waumbeck St., Roxbury 

P. O. Box 148, Sandwich 

66 Chandler St., Holbrook 

27 Harvard St., Brockton 

127 Summer St., Abington 

Bridge Road, Orleans 

Main St., Somerset 

635 Maple St., Fall River 

17 Gaudette Ave., Brockton 

81 Newbury St., Brockton 

110 West Britannia St., Taunton 

141 South Main St., Attleboro 

75 Platts St., North Abington 

29 Ellington St., Dorchester 

16 Ashland Ave., Southbridge 

P. O. Box 6, Merrimacport 



THREE DARK PINES 



Three dark pines against the sky, 
In sunset lights a silhouette. 
Three dark pines upon the heights, 
A common sight, and yet- 
Stately boughs outlined, 
An awesome spectacle to see; 



Wind-blown and storm-tossed, 
Yet strong, enduring, as the sea, 
Their heads up-held in pride. 
Thus privileged to stand 
And gaze, unbent by storm 
As sentinels, out o'er the land. 

Dorothy Look 



79 



Autographs 



80 



^UJ)ENTfC00PERA7Wfi 
^-ASSfiCBJIOIF 




1933 ALPHA 





h ' - !9m|V 


1 C0UI1UU> ly^L" " 


1 |||M«U»" 


^-! 


lM* »t|b' I|iii| iIH' 1 ^^^^^__ ^^^^$$^*^ u 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Elizabeth Lawrence 
Mona Morris 
Dorothy Hixon 
Mary Carroll 



THE STUDENT CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION 

The Student Co-operative Association is the largest and most important organization 
in the school. Every student who enters the school automatically becomes a member of this 
body. 

Its purpose is to regulate all matters pertaining to student life which do not fall under 
the jurisdiction of the faculty, to promote a spirit of unity among the students of the school 
in every way possible, and to continue to maintain the high standards of Bridgewater Nor- 
mal School in Bridgewater Teachers College. This purpose is carried out through the work 
of the various councils. The Student Council is the greatest force, its membership being 
truly representative, for it is composed of men and women, day and dormitory students, 
classes and divisions of classes. 

It is this group that tries to improve the life of the school by keeping abreast with all 
new movements in student collegiate life and adapting the best of these to our own college 
life. 

Meetings are held on the first Friday of every month, and regular attendance is re- 
quired in order that the work may be efficiently carried on. 

This year the council has been able to place a large bulletin board outside the auditorium, 
on which space is provided for W. A. A., Clubs, Notes of Interest to All, Posters, and Men's 
Activities. It has also purchased a silver tea service for the school, and has been able to 
help clubs financially. 

Because of the change in the name of the school, it has been necessary to have a new seal 
and a new song; and in order to give an equal opportunity to each student who had some 
suggestions for either a song or a seal, the council held contests and offered a prize to the 
winner of the seal contest. 

In order that the students may be more interested in Campus Comment, the council 
has voted to send a delegate from the student body to the Scholastic Press Association which 
will meet in New York, in March. The council has also voted to send the President and 
Vice-President-elect of Student Council and a representative of the men to the conferences 
held by the Eastern States Association in New York, in April. 



82 



ORGANIZATIONS 




w— R. FERRIS, R. BURR, C. JOHNSON, B. VINAL, R. MANNION, J. NOLAN, J, CARROLL, R. GLIDDEN 
>w— R. CUSHING, E. BEANE, M. FISHER, C. CALLAHAN, K. MURPHY, D. WESTGATE, S. PENTI- 

KAINEN, D. JONES, 
w— B. RANDLETT, F. BAKER, D. HIXON, E. LAWRENCE, M. MORRIS, M, CARROLL, D. KITSON, 
M. TIERNEY. 



STUDENT COUNCIL 



Class A 

President Clifford Johnson 

Representative Al — Ruth Glidden 
Representative A2 — Florence Baker 
Representative A3 — William Johnson 



Class B 

President Earl Sukeforth 

Representative Bl — Ruth Ferris 
Representative B2 — Miriam Fisher 
Representative B3 — Margaret Kimball 
Representative B4 — Evelyn Beane 
Representative B5 — Ruth Burr 
Representative B6 — John Smith 



Class C 

President Kenneth Murphy 

Representative CI — Demetra Kitson 
Representative C2 — Ruth Mannion 
Representative C3 — Jane Carroll 
Representative C4 — Ruth Rider 
Representative C5 — Charles Callahan 

Class D 

President Stephen Lovett 

Representative Dl — Dorothy Westgate 
Representative D2 — Doris Jones 
Representative D3 — Sylvia Pentikainen 
Representative D4A — Rita Cushing 
Representative D4B — Mary Tierney 
Representative D5 — John Nolan 



President of Day Student Council — Barbara Vinal 
President of Dormitory Council — Barbara Randlett 



83 



1933 ALPHA 




3rd row— G. DAVIDIAN, O. McMURDIE, R. MANNION, G. BARNES, R. NUGENT, E. BISCOE. 

2nd row— M. EYRE, E. BEEDE, M. DEPLITCH, E. REYNOLDS, M. MOORE, V. DUNN, A. KELLEHER. 

1st row— H. BROWN, M. MacDONALD, B, RANDLETT, E. TARR. M. LARAMEE, M. COLLINS. 



DORMITORY COUNCIL 



President .... 
Vice-President 
Secretary -Treasurer 
President, Woodward Hall 
President, Normal Hall 
President, Gates House 
Vice-President, Woodward . 
Vice-President, Normal 
Vice-President, Gates House 
Secretary, Woodward . 
Treasurer, Woodward . 
Secretary-Treasurer, Normal 
Secretary-Treasurer, Gates House 
Head Proctor, Woodward 
Head Proctor, Woodward . 
Head Proctor, Woodward . 
Assistant Proctor, Woodward 
Assistant Proctor, Woodward 
Assistant Proctor, Woodward 
Assistant Proctor, Woodward 
Proctor, Normal . 



Barbara Randlett 

Mildred MacDonald 

Esther Tarr 

Mildred MacDonald 

Mabel Larramee 

Harriet Brown 

Evelyn Biscoe 

Ruth Nugent 

Ethel Beede 

Grace Knox 

Marion Collins 

Ruth Mannion 

Doris Grade 

Marion Deplitch 

Gertrude Barnes 

Olga McMurdie 

Arlene Kelleher 

Priscilla Coleman 

. Eleanor Martin 

Veronica Bingle 

Verda Dunn 



84 



ORGANIZATIONS 



Proctor, Normal 

Proctor, Normal 

Proctor, Normal 

Freshman Representative, Woodward 
Freshman Representative, Normal 
Freshman Representative, Gates House 



Gladys Davidian 

Anne Gutman 

Cecilia Perkins 

Muriel Moore 

Muriel Eyre 

Ernestine Reynolds 



DORMITORY COUNCIL 

Dormitory Council is the organization whose duty it is to regulate and supervise student 
life in the dormitories. 

Its first task of the year was meeting the Freshmen and helping them to become ac- 
quainted. In this we were aided by the "Big Sisters", who were most helpful and cooper- 
ative. 

It has been one of the Council's aims to provide for more informal social gatherings, 
especially on weekends. This work was begun very early in the year. Such games as 
parchesi, checkers, and backgammon were purchased and informal parties have been held 
in Normal Reception Room on Saturday evenings directly after dinner. These have been 
extremely popular and well attended. 

Dormitory Council also conceived the idea of having demi-tasse served in the Reception 
Room Sunday noon. With the cooperation of Mrs. Bixby we have carried out this idea. 
We have been able to use the new pewter coffee set, with senior girls acting as pourers. 

Because of the funds raised by a movie benefit and various sales, we have been able to 
add to the furnishings of Normal Reception Room. 

The weekends of the Graduates' Conference and of Open House were unusually success- 
ful. The tea held in Normal Reception Room for the Open House guests gave an oppor- 
tunity for the families of the students to meet the faculty. 

For the remainder of this year, our attention has been devoted to smoothing out other 
dormitory problems. 

Esther Tarr 



85 



1933 ALPHA 



SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 



Chairman 

Vice-Chairman 

Secretary-Treasurer 



Mona Morris 
Ruth Nugent 
Isabel Tutty 



Social Activities Committee has endeavored to provide a complete and varied program 
in order that the student body might have ample time for social diversions at college. It 
has also tried to foster a spirit of genuine friendliness among the students by giving them 
opportunity to meet informally. Dormitory and day students alike enjoy the activities 
arranged by the committee. 

For a more detailed account of the work of this organization, we refer you to the social 
calendar on another page. 




86 



ORGANIZATIONS 




3rd row— H. HEIKKILA, R. FAUNCE, E. HOLBROOK, F. DILLON, H. LEONARD, M. BOWMAN. 

2nd row— A. JOHNSON, M. McLAUGHLIN, H. RUSSELL. M. KEITH, H. FOWLER, R. FLYNN, A. DROHAN. 

1st row— M. MURRAY, D. SPELLMAN, A. FENTON, B. VINAL, E. CHASSEE, L. McHUGH, S. KRUPKA. 

DAY STUDENT COUNCIL 

President Barbara Vinal 

Vice-President Alice Fenton 

Secretary-Treasurer Evelyn Chasse 

Representatives : 

Hilda Heikkila, Mildred Bowman, Esther Holbrook, Alice Olson, Gladys Ryan, Marian 
Keith, Alice Drohan, Stella Krupka, Rita Flynn, Mary Dyer, Doris Spellman, Helen Rus- 
sell, Hazel Fowler, Rebecca Faunce, Florence Dillon, Dorothy Turner, Adelaide Johnson, 
Mary McLaughlin, Mary Murray, Helen Leonard, Rita Cassidy. 

For the first time in the history of Bridgewater, Day and Dormitory Students were 
about equal in number this year. That has meant a crowding of tables and chairs in the 
Commuters' dining room; but cheerfulness and a comradely spirit have helped bridge the 
difficulty, even though the overflow found nothing but stools or barren folding chairs in the 
domestic science room. 

There has been a special effort made this year to decorate the dining room, to relieve 
the bareness of the walls. The junior class in design undertook the task. With a color 
scheme suggested by the wall-hanging at one end of the room, they designed attractive 
paper mache bowls and platters brightening up the space considerably. It is hoped in 
time that there will be a "cozy corner" with a magazine and newspaper rack. The Day 
Students' Social was a gala circus affair this year, with a parade, freaks, pink lemonade, ice 
cream cones, and all the rest of it. We never have found out yet who was under that 
elephant skin! 

To make the year even more distinctive, a tea was given by the freshmen at which the 
commuters, and their mothers and friends, were the invited guests. 

87 Evelyn Chasse 



1933 ALPHA 



r>~ i CULTURE r 



.^ 




Chairman 

Secretary 

Seniors 

Juniors 

Sophomores 

Faculty . 



-E. BATES, E. SHAFFNER, MISS SMITH, K. MURPHY, R. HENRY, M.MacDONALD. 
-MISS BECKWITH, U. LINEHAN, B. RANDLETT, MISS HILL. 



Urban Linehan 

Barbara Randlett 

Mildred MacDonald 

Alfred Wood, Emily Shaffner, Ruth Henry 

Emily Bates 

Miss Hill, Miss Smith, Miss Beckwith 



CULTURE FUND REPORT 

With the inauguration of the Budget System formed to insure financial support of student 
activities, it seemed in keeping with the educational interests of this institution to provide 
some form of purely cultural activity. The selection rests with a committee composed of 
representatives of the student body and members of the faculty. The committee aims to 



ORGANIZATIONS 



present lecture programs during the year which will be of cultural value to the faculty and 
student body. 

Each year shows an added interest and satisfaction in what is presented, and the com- 
mittee truly feels that this year has been no exception. In as many of the selections as 
possible, the aim has been to enlarge the cultural value of some specific department in this 
college. 

As our first speaker, we chose Mrs. Katherine Osborne, director of the Students' Union, 
in Boston. Mrs. Osborne has traveled all over the world, and has many fine collections 
of varied nature. Her title, "How to Make a Library without Money or Books," was 
descriptive of this unique and interesting lecture. An authority on paper, she brought with 
her samples of books from London book stalls, and most intriguing books made by herself 
in the style of the Chinese. Who would believe that such lovely Chinese paper existed, 
for so small a cost! Her collections of clippings, many of them rare and valuable because 
the material can not be procured in book form, roused much enthusiasm for this hobby. 

Dr. Harlow Shapley, director of the Harvard Observatory since 1921, next addressed 
us on "New Developments in the Exploration of the Universe." A recognized leader in 
the field of science, he showed us that the changes brought about by time in the past, and 
those to take place in the future, mean changes in life and living. 

Music was represented by Mr. Rulon Robison, a noted Boston tenor, and by a program 
of Chinese music. All appreciated the delightful informality of Mr. Robison's program, 
the numbers of which Mr. Robison himself presented. 

Biography as a current, living, human experience was the central theme of an address 
by Dr. Harold E. B. Speight, Head of the Department of Biography, Dartmouth College. 
The title of his address was "The Making of some Great Men of Our Times." Born in 
England, educated in the Universities of Aberdeen and Oxford, Dr. Speight became a citi- 
zen of the United States, and served as chaplain in the war in France. Prominent per- 
sonalities, primarily as they were made rather than born, were treated by Dr. Speight with 
sympathetic understanding. As members of a teacher-training institution, we especially 
felt the value of his final message: the potential power of every teacher, and the responsi- 
bility assumed, for shaping the personality of the individual. 

In February, we were especially fortunate in securing Dr. Edward Howard Griggs, of 
New York, one of the most popular and forceful lecturers on the American platform to-day. 
At present he is president of the Department of Philosophy at the Brooklyn Institute of 
Arts and Sciences. His deep, rich learning has been devoted to many subjects, and the 
highest faith and idealism were echoed to us in his lecture on "Friendship, Love, and Mar- 
riage." 

In order to round out its program, Culture Fund will select for the remainder of the 
year lectures on Art and Current Events. 

We of the committee feel that the work had been successful, in that each presentation 
met its cultural aims. We wish for next year's committee the success and improvement 
which we know comes with a progressive institution. 



89 



1933 ALPHA 




90 



BUILDINGS 



DORMITORIES 




Woodward Hall 



House Officers 

President . . . Mildred MacDonald 

Vice-Pres Evelyn Biscoe 

Secretary Grace Knox 

Treasurer Marian Collins 

The work so well started by last year's President, Sadie Gould, has been carried forward 
successfully by Mildred MacDonald. 

At the beginning of the year, House Board outlined its plans for raising money, and by 
means of various sales, amateur nights, and movie benefits, the treasury has been increased. 

Woodward Reception Room and Recreation Room have been and probably still will be, 
the centers for various improvements. 

The kitchenette has been a great source of pleasure to the girls and its popularity can 
easily be seen by the clamoring for it, especially on week-ends. It is hoped that by the end 
of June, additional facilities will allow more girls to make use of it. 

Many a spread has been made pleasanter with the aid of the kitchenette, and we hesitate 
to estimate how many birthday parties have originated there. 

With a very enjoyable year behind us, House Board extends its best wishes for a pros- 
perous and successful new year. 

Grace Knox 



91 



1933 ALPHA 




92 



BUILDINGS 





a^mfis 




| UOKMIIOKILS |^^ 


1 |||M'il'"" 


— — i 


XT1B 





Normal Hall 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



Mabel Laramee 

Ruth Nugent 

Ruth Mannion 



At the end of an interesting and enjoyable year, we, the students of Normal Hall, pause 
a moment in our busy life to take account of stock. 

We offer the following inventory of our activities and accomplishments for the year. 

The reception room, where we held our merry Hallowe'en and Christmas parties, has 
been improved by the addition of several pieces of furniture. Speaking of Hallowe'en 
parties — will you ever forget the afternoon we spent down in Irma's room digging out pump- 
kins? 

People have wondered where we got the Santa that guarded our door during the Christ- 
mas season. The credit is due to the Freshmen — just another example of the old Normal 
Hall spirit. 

The last half of the year found Normal Hall setting the fashion. How? It became the 
style to keep health rules; and since the majority of our girls joined the ranks of this much 
approved brigade, we set the pace for the other dormitories. The profit we have gained 
from this last activity gives us tremendous enthusiasm to begin in the fall at the point where 
we have to stop in June. 



93 



1933 ALPHA 




94 



BUILDINGS 



DORMITORIES 




Gates House 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary -Treasurer 



Harriet Brown 
Ethel Beede 
Doris Grade 



We may be the little dormitory, but we have high ambitions! 

This year we were glad to welcome five freshmen and a lone sophomore to our group. 
Although we lack the presence of mighty seniors, we function well under the leadership of 
our president and our house mother, Miss Henderson — and seem to lack no dignity! 

We feel proud to have added to our household equipment a set of dishes, silver, and a 
bridge lamp. But this is only a beginning. 

Behind us we have the memories of Freshman Initiation, which now affords as much 
amusement to the freshmen as to the upperclassmen, our Depression Social, and many 
merry gatherings — a source of much delight! Before us we have the hope of other happy 
and successful times. 

Next year will find our small group practically intact and so we look forward to a con- 
tinuation of all the friendships of this year and the welcoming of a few more members to 
our "dorm"! 

Doris Grade 



95 



1933 ALPHA 




96 



1933 ALPHA 



EXPLANATION OF THE DECORATIONS IN THE ALPHA 

Since our year book, formerly known as Normal Offering, was the first ever published 
by any normal school, and since this is our first full year as a college, we have tried to express 
the "pioneering" spirit throughout the art of the Alpha. This time we are pioneers in the 
modern world of nineteen hundred thirty-three. 

The illustration for "Classes" typifies co-education and particularly emphasizes the 
use of modern apparatus as a phase of the new education. 

The co-operation necessary in the building up and maintaining of an organization like 
"Student Co-operation Association" is symbolized by the construction of a skyscraper. 
Strength, too, is suggested by those steel girders. 

On the page for "Organizations" an airplane, representative of the machinery to-day, 
is used to demonstrate a unit, the parts of which work together in absolute synchronization. 
The element of speed, common to present day vehicles, is contrasted with the emblem of 
Bellerophon and Pegasus, shown in the background. 

Unusual modern book covers suggest the design for the "Literature" cut. 

In this way a unified whole has been achieved by exemplifying the pioneering spirit in 
each illustration. 



APPRECIATION 

It is with much sincere appreciation that the Alpha Staff wishes to thank all those who 
have made the work of the yearbook so pleasant a task and so enjoyable an experience. 

We are particularly grateful to the faculty advisors for their unfailing helpfulness, — 
and especially, to Miss Ruth Davis, whose past experience in yearbook work has been so 
generously expended for our benefit. 



ORGANIZATIONS 




ALPHA BOARD 
Editor-in-Chief 
Asst. Editor . 
Treasurer 
Business Manager 
Advertising Manager 
Asst. Adv. Mgr. . 
Staff Photographer 
Asst. Photographer 
Staff Art Editor . 
Asst. Art Editor . 
Literary Editor 
Asst. Lit. Editor . 
W. A. A. Representative 
N. A. A. Representative 

Division Editors: 
Al Mary Dyer A2 Pauline Donovan 

Bl Anne Ginnetty 

B2 Gladys Davidian 

B3 Marcella Moran 

B4 Isabel Gabriel 

B5 Helen Foye 

B6 Charles Aherne 
Dl Barbara Albret D2 

D4 Ruth Bumpus 



CI 
C2 
C3 
C4 
C5 



Helen Barker 



Katherine Ross 
D5 

ALPHA TYPING BOARD 
Beatrice Fitts — Chairman 



Beatrice Hunt 

Verda Dunn 

Alfred Wood 

Clifford Johnson 

Kenneth Murphy 

Paul Hill 

Samuel Solmer 

George Morris 

Madeline Caswell 

Loretta McHugh 

Grace Curley 

Emily Bates 

Ruth Ferris 

Robert Nagle 



A3 Lewis Lerner 
Claire Cook 
Alice Gilmartin 
Katherine Hofferty 
Sadie Lambe 
George Jones 



D3 Elizabeth Johnson 
Michael Moran 



Anne Pickens 



Isabel Tutty 



Dolores Guidaboni 



99 



1933 ALPHA 



w 


i ~^w» 




1 CAMPUS COMMLM 1 3pC " " 




^■» 





Editor-in-chief 
Ass't Editor . 
Business Manager 
Ass't Business Manager 
Make-up Editor 
Secretary 



Gertrude Laird 

Charlotte Murray 

Arthur Lewis 

John Bates 

Evelyn Chasse 

Laura Mitchell 



REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Harold Brewer, Olive Brittan, Francis Champagne, Marjorie Keith, Alice Guilmartin, 
Kathleen Hofferty, Myrtle Pray, Ellen Shea, Barbara Albert, Eileen Lloyd, Virginia Ford, 
Bessie Freitas, Lucienne Galipeau, Loretta McHugh. 

To create a little that is literature; a little that is lasting; a little, gay; a little, useful; 
a whole that is interesting, is the policy of Campus Comment. Throughout the year a 
competitively-selected group has tried to give practical form to such a theory. 

In addition to the regular newspaper work the board has this year tried to perfect the 
details of the new system of selection by competition. It is their hope to create for the com- 
ing year an efficient self-possessed board, armed with an invincible oracle-like constitution. 
The ultimate aim is a "carry-over" of experience and an eventual marked progress. 



100 



ORGANIZATIONS 




3rd row— E. LLOYD, V. FORD. L. MITCHELL, E. SHEA. 

2nd row— K. HOFFERTY. E. TAYLOR, B. FREITAS, H. BREWER, O . BRITTAN, L. McHUGH, A. GUILMARTIN. 

1st row— M. PRAY, J. BATES, E. CHASSE, MISS LOVETT, G. LAIRD, A. LEWIS, J. SWEENEY, M. KEITH. 



MEDITATION 

The stars have been playing peek-a-boo with my soul 

All night long- 
Out in the snow on the hill. 
I have seen strange shapes dancing, 
And strange steeds prancing, 

Out in the snow on the hill, 

All night long — 
With the stars playing peek-a-boo with my soul. 



Hazel S. Prescott 



101 



1933 ALPHA 




Officers of the Dramatic Club 



Directrix 
President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Property Mistress 
Wardrobe Mistress 



Adelaide Moffitt 

Louise Hewitt 

Dorothy Chatterton 

Gunvor Henriksen 

Jane Carroll 

Rose Tinsley 



The Year's Work 

Sept. 20 — First meeting of year 

Sept. 27 — The club decided to try a new plan and put on three one-act-plays: 

"The Eldest" by Edna Ferber 
"Bargains in Cathay" — Rachel Field 
"Hearts To Mend" — H. A. Overstreet 

Oct. 8 — The club went to see "Green Pastures" by Marc Connelly at the Colonial. 

Nov. 18 — The club presented with great success the chosen one-act plays with the following 
cast: 

"Bargains in Cathay" 



Emily Gray . 




Rose Tinsley 


Jerry O'Brien 




Virginia Bulger 


Miss Doty 




. Dorothy Hixon 


Thompson Williams 




Dorothv Chatterton 


Miss Bliss 




Cecelia Perkins 


Mr. Royce 




Ruth Mannion 


Gentleman from N. Y. 


"The Eldest" 


Muriel Robie 


Rose .... 




Barbara Randlett 


Flossie .... 




Virginia Cochrane 


Al . ... 




Virginia Bulger 


Pa 




Muriel Robie 


Ma 




Louise Hewitt 


Henry Selz 




Louise Hewitt 


Neighbor 




Cecelia Perkins 



102 



ORGANIZATIONS 



Mm MPs 




y> ' lie: 




I i mr ' iJlBE' - : ' — ' 


wk'\ 


itf w « 


Mr^fljjf ;*„,, 


Hi y Bui 






fcjyl 


feftsf^fl ^^rJ| 


^^B^** 







2nd row— V. COCHRANE, V. BULGER, B. RANDLETT, M. ROBIE, D. HIXON, R. MANNION. 

J. CARROLL, H. KIDSTON. C. PERKINS. 
1st row— R. TINSLEY, L. HEWITT, MISS MOFFITT, D. CHATTERTON, G. HENRIKSON. 

THE DRAMATIC CLUB 
"Hearts To Mend" 



Pierrot 

Pierrette 

Tinker 



Jane Carroll 

Hilda Kidston 

Gunvor Henriksen 



The stage managers for these plays were Mildred Macdonald, Carol Chace, and Phyllis 
Clark. 
Nov. 29— The club voted to send $50 to the Public Welfare Fund and $10 to the Training 

School Library. 
Dec. 20 — A most delightful Christmas Party was held at Miss Mofhtt's home. 

Dec. 23 — "Why the Chimes Rang" was presented in chapel and to the Training School 
with the following cast: 



Holger 


Virginia Cochrane 


Priest 


Rose Tinsley 


Stein 


Cecelia Perkins 


Lady in Green 


Hilda Kidston 


Bertee 


Dorothy Hixon 


King 


Ruth Mannion 


Old Lady 


Barbara Randlett 


Angel 


Jane Carroll 


Rich Woman 


Louise Hewitt 


Courtier 


Dorothy Chatterton 


Student 


Gunvor Henriksen 







Jan. 3 — Work started on the "Taming of the Shrew" to be presented May fifth. 

Dramatic Club feels very grateful to the faculty and students for their co-operation dur- 
ing the past year. The club acknowledges more than ever the helpful, inspiring leadership 
of Miss Adelaide Moffitt. 

Gunvor Henriksen 

103 



1933 ALPHA 




President 
Vice-Pres. 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Verda Dunn 

Elsie Taylor 

Ruth Koss 

Mildred Moran 



Valuable meetings, interesting projects, and outstanding guests have all contributed 
to the success which Library Club has enjoyed this year. 

We planned our programs to fulfill our belief that books and people are an ideal combi- 
nation. Accordingly, you might have found us at one time deeply interested in Hans Ander- 
sen and his immortal fairy tales, or again listening intently to a serious debate on the relative 
merits of older and modern writers. 

The club has served the college in several ways. Two of our members have taken charge 
of the reference library in the gymnasium, and others took the responsibility of writing the 
book column each month for Campus Comment. Most closely associated with the club 
itself is the lending library in Miss Carter's classroom. This year we have added several 
new popular books to our circulation; among them are "Invitation to the Waltz" by Rosa- 
mund Lehmann whose "Dusty Answer" created such comment, O'Neill's "Nine Plays", 
and "Maid in Waiting" by Galsworthy. 

As our chapel speaker we had the privilege of presenting Miss Katherine Dewey, 
teacher of art in the Brush Hill School in Milton, and illustrator of many books. From her 
we learned of the technicalities of illustrating, of the tremendous amount of research neces- 
sary for even the most simple illustration, and had the pleasure of seeing original drawings 
of her own. 

At the close of this, another year of purposeful activity, Library Club hands on its torch 
of service to next year's members. 

Ruth Koss 



104 



ORGANIZATIONS 



*1 ^^^ HR ;M '-i-^aa^i ■E^il 


f 1 

p * • 





3rd row— M. CAMPBELL. E. LLOYD, I. KIDD, H. McGINN, O. FULLER, R. SULLIVAN. E. TARR. M. 

HARRINGTON. R. SIZER. 
2nd row— A. CHESTNA. M. CARROLL, L. MITCHELL, F. NORTON, B. LIBBEY, M. AMSDEN, K. ROSS, 

E. HOWE. B. HORTON. 
1st row— M. CULLEN, M. MOREN, E. TAYLOR, MISS CARTER, V. DUNN, R. VAN CAMPEN, A. HOMER. 

LENDING LIBRARY 

Judging from the circulation of the Lending Library, pleasure reading is one of the most 
popular hobbies among the students of our college. That there is much discrimination 
in this broad field is evident from the choice of books that are always out or seldom taken 
from the shelves. 

In general, the students prefer modern fiction, and are especially attracted to the books 
secured from the Book-of-the-Month Club. The arrival of one of these books is announced 
by its display in the library, with a notice to the students and a sign-up sheet. After several 
days it goes into active service, reaching the students in the order in which they signed. 
When all have had the book it is replaced on the shelves and ready for other patrons. 

This year there are three books which have been in great demand. Although the "Good 
Earth" by Pearl S. Buck was featured for last year, its popularity has not waned, for there 
is a continual waiting list for it. 

A volume of nine plays by Eugene O'Neill, selected as his own favorites, has had a most 
enthusiastic public. Innumerable students have echoed the pulsations of "Strange Inter- 
lude", and have sat tense while reading "Mourning Becomes Electra", "The Hairy Ape", 
or "Emperor Jones". 

And third, only because it was a late addition, comes "Ann Vickers", by Sinclair Lewis. 
No doubt curiosity has tempted many to read it, but they have finished the last page with 
the almost unanimous statement that the story was beautiful and terrible, compassionate 
and true. Ann Vickers portrays the modern American woman, the business woman, the 
social worker, the successful feminist, who in the last thirty years has lived a century in 
the history of women. 

Yes, the lending library has modern books as well as the classics for literature courses. 



105 



1933 ALPHA 




LE CERCLE FRANCAIS 



Presidente 
Vice Presidente 
Tresoriere 
Secretaire 
Bibliothecaire 



E. Stromdahl 

. R. McKee 

E. Martin 

O. McMurdie 

L. Galipeau 



Au mois de septembre le Cercle Francais commenca l'annee en celebrant vivement 
l'occasion de son pique-nique annuel sur les bords du lac de Carver. En octobre le Cercle 
choisit comme but de l'annee, "Mieux connaitre les Francais". Le programme de l'annee 
fut organise la dessus. 

A la seance d'initiation des neuf nouveaux membres, Mile. Dolores Rousseau, une 
ancienne tresoriere du Cercle, fut notre conferenciere. Elle nous parla d'une facon en- 
thousiaste de ses experiences comme etudiante a. 1'universite de Paris pendant l'annee passee. 

Des programmes dramatiques et musicaux offrirent l'occasion de "nous instruire en 
nous amusant." Parmi eux il y a a. noter "Romeo et Juliette" ou quelques cantatrices du 
Cercle firent leur debut musical. M. Hubbard, diplome de Bates College, nous resuma 
d'une facon interessante l'opera bouffon, "Cyrano de Bergerac"; Mile. Laramee prit la 
parole pour nous causer de l'opera "Du Barry" auquel elle assista avec notre presidente, 
Mile. Stromdahl, en invitees du Cercle. 

Le debat se montra aussi un type d'amusement agreable. Le Cercle fut d'accord avec 
le cote affirmatif qui prouva qu'on devrait permettre a une femme mariee de poursuivre 
une carriere. 

Le Cercle Francais fut au comble de la joie a l'occasion du "Bridge" auquel chaque 
membre invita une amie. 

La fin de l'annee apportera avec elle le pique-nique, cette fete au grand air qui est l'occas- 
sion de dire l'adieu a nos cheres dipl6mees. 

L'annee 1932-1933, avec son travail diligent et ses joies vives, accomplit, on ne peut 
nier, le but du Cercle, "s'instruire en s'amusant." 

0. McMurdie 



106 



ORGANIZATIONS 




3rd row— I. WAARANEN, R. FERRIS, G. SALEY. C. COOKE. A. McKEE, A. FOLEY, C. GRIFFITH. A. CARR. M. LARAMEE 
2nd row— M. BOUCHER, D. PILOTE, B. DYMOWSKA, C. MARTIN, D. SAMPSON. R. CRONIN, A. PICKENS, O. ANDER- 
SON. 
1st row— E. MOURA, L. GALIPEAU. O. McMURDIE, E. STROMDAHL, MISS BRADFORD, R. McKEE, E. MARTIN 
S. BIANCHI, M. DEARBORN. 



Les Membres du Cercle Francais Comme on les Connait. 



Melle. Bradford le philosophe 

E. Stromdahl la charmante 

R. McKee la bavarde 

0. McMurdie la bien aimee 

E. Martin la capricieuse 

L. Galipeau la capable 

M. Laramee l'artiste 

1. Waaranen la sarcastique 

O. Anderson le bebe 

S. Bianchi la cherie 

M. Boucher la silencieuse 

R. Dionne la rigolo 

B. Dymowska le petit Larousse 

R. Ferris la beaute 

H. Johnson la precieuse 

A. Pickens l'insouciante 



G. Saley la ricaneuse 

D. Sampson le bon confrere 

M. Wanelik l'inquiete 

C. Cook la diligente 

A. Foley l'animee 

C. Martin la fidele 

D. Pilote labouffonne 

E. Sullivan la comedienne 

A. Carr la spirituelle 

R. Cronin la musicienne 

M. Dearborn l'industrieuse 

C. Griffiths l'originale 

A. Halloran la gentille 

A. McKee la tranquille 

E. Moura la fossette 



107 



1933 ALPHA 




TOPICS OF THE DAY CLUB 



Executive Committee 



President 

Vice-Pres. 

Secretary 
Treasurer 



Beatrice Hunt 
Ruth Henry 
Ruth Henry 
Evelyn Davis 
Mona Morris 
Ethel McEnelly 



Chairman 



Anne Gutman 
Grace Curley 
Mary Campbell 
Florence Quigley 



Ruth Henry 
Evelyn Davis 



Topics of the Day Club celebrated its first anniversary this year. It has grown from a 
nucleus of about fifteen members — mcst of whom were of the dissolved Pro and Con club — 
to a grand total of fifty. 

This year has been one fruitful in knowledge for participants in the club meetings. Its 
members are well versed in current problems. The Sino-Japanese situation, the Indian 
problem, the question of War Debts, and Fascism are only a few subjects which we have 
attacked and tried to understand. We, too, like so many others, were bitten by that new 
bug, Technocracy, but fortunately survived the disease without any harmful effects. 

The club affords an excellent opportunity to air one's pet ideas, and yet to retain one's 
"open-mindedness," a sign of genuine interest in the subjects discussed. 

Mona Morris 



108 



ORGANIZATIONS 




4th row— V. FORD, M. SHEA, M. CROWLEY, I. GABRIEL. E. GILLEN. P. DREYINSKY. L. GUY. E. LLOYD, R. SULLI- 
VAN, A. LEARY, H. HALL, N. DEANE, H. KOVALCHUK, II. McGOVERN, G. SALEY, G. HENRICKSEN, E. MARTIN. 

3rd row— A. KELLIHER, E. SHERMAN, L. McHUGH, M. FISHER. M. TILTON, R. BRETELLE, J. HAWES, N. PETER- 
SON, B. LIBBEY, B.SMITH, D.JONES, P. HEYWORTH, D. LOOK, P. STEWART, M. HARRINGTON, A. CHESTNA, 
A. KENNEDY, E. HOLMES. 

2nd row— O. MARTINI, B. CUSICK, A. GUTMAN, M. CAMPBELL, M. MORRIS, B. HUNT, MISS SMITH, R. HENRY, 
A. HADRO, G. CURLEY, F. QUIGLEY, A. HOMER, B. FREITAS. 

1st row— O. ANDERSON, C. REILLY, K. ROSS, M. MAHADY, G. GAVIN. 

TOPICS OF THE DAY CLUB 



What do you know about these subjects? 
of them with interest this year. 



Topics of the Day Club has considered each 



Personalities of To-day 

India — Her Latest Developments 

The Garden City — Radburn, N. J. 

The Presidential Campaign and Election 

Fascism 

Governmental Problems in England, Russia, Germany, South America 

International Outlook at Geneva 

Grand Chaco Dispute 

War Debts Question 

Sino-Japanese Situation 

Lame Duck Congress 

Technocracy 

Calvin Coolidge 

Phillipine Question 

Roosevelt Cabinet 



109 



1933 ALPHA 




2nd row— V. MILICI, G. JONES, H. CADWELL 

S. GREGORY. 
1st row— D. COOK, MISS LOVETT, L. LERNER, W. JOHNSON 



SOLMER, H. BREWER, U. LINEHAN, 
LEWIS. 



LYCEUM 



President 
Vice-President 
Treasurer 
Secretary 



Louis Lerner 
William Johnson 

Ravmond Cook 



The Bridgewater Lyceum, though founded for the purpose of encouraging informal 
debating among the men of the college, has many interesting side lines. Informal group 
discussions of current events and talks add much to the interest of the meetings as well as 
giving instruction. Among the various subjects discussed by our own members have been 
"Russia", "Nova Scotia", and that new and perplexing problem of "Technocracy". After 
the presentation of the topic, there is a general discussion, during which we profit by each 
other's knowledge by means of the free interchange of ideas. 

This year we have had as our guests various professional and business men who have 
spoken to us on subjects in which they were particularly interested. One of the most in- 
teresting talks presented was one given by Mr. Durgin. He spoke in his inimitable way 
on the "World War and its Effects." 

We feel that we have by no means exhausted the wealth of possible topics and challenge 
next year's group to further explore them. 



110 






ORGANIZATIONS 



MEN'S CLUB 

President William Johnson 

Vice-President Joseph Morey 

Secretary Raymond Cook 

Treasurer Walter Nardelli 

Men's Club started off with a bang this year. An enthusiastic "esprit de corps" com- 
bined with the fortunate choice of Bill Johnson for president assured the club of a banner 
year. 

First came the successful presentation of the show of shows — "The Follies of 1933". 
This was followed by a Christmas party, given to the Americanization Class at the Bridge- 
water High School. We were also of practical service by contributing to the Welfare 
Society of the town. 

"And Billy Disappeared", a four-act mystery play, marked our second attempt at drama- 
tics. Who can still believe that the leopard doesn't change his spots, after the way the men 
impersonated women that evening? 

Our annual visit to a near-by State Institution — in the capacity of entertainers! — cer- 
tainly was appreciated. Chalk up another score for Bill! 

Every month, meetings of the organization were held in the men's room in Normal Hall 
for which interesting and worth while programs were arranged. Of special interest were 
representatives from the three major political parties who conducted a forum just before 
the election. 

The addition of a radio has made the club room a much more sociable place where com- 
muters and dormitory men regularly congregate. 

Raymond Cook 




The following paragraph was written by the sixth grade pupils in our Training School 
in memory of Dr. Boyden: 

"We were very sorry to hear of the death of Dr. Boyden. He had a young heart, and 
loved all boys and girls. We feel we have lost one of our best friends." 



Ill 



1933 ALPHA 




President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Librarian 



Alice Lindstrom 

Chauncey Copeland 

Doris McMahon 

Earle Sukeforth 

Charlotte Murray 



The main feature of the Science Club for the year has been the use of materials which 
aid in the visual and practical teaching of science rather than in the theoretical. This aim 
has been accomplished by making charts to assist in science work, by taking field trips, and 
by showing suitable films. 

Although the educational side has been stressed, the social end of club activity has not 
been neglected. Each member has ended the year with the feeling that he has meant some- 
thing to the club and that the club has helped him to acquire a greater interest in science, 
a better understanding of its value, and many helpful hints along the way to be used when 
he starts "his own" science club. 

Doris McMahon 



112 



ORGANIZATIONS 




3nd row— M. LEVERING, R. CURLEY. E. McENELLY. 
2nd row— E. LINDBERG, S. McKENNA. H. SULLIVAN, R. KOSS. 
1st row— D McMAHON, A. LINDSTROM, MISS GRAVES, E.' SUKEFORTH, 
C. MURRAY. 



UNDER THE MICROSCOPE 

Alice Lindstrom — "All nature speaks in music." 

Charlotte Murray — "And the grasshopper shall be a burden." 

Chauncey Copeland — "Nature speaks a various meaning." 

Doris McMahon — "You cannot make a crab walk straight." 

Earle Sukeforth — "But the trail of the serpent is over them all. 

Esther Lindberg — "Transformed sunbeams." 

Ethel McEnelly — "Content of Spirit must from science flow." 

Mary Levering — "Singing spheres." 

Richard Curley — "Sermons in stones." 

Ruth Koss — "Blue ethereal sky." 

Susan McKenna — "Flower in a crannied wall." 



113 



1933 ALPHA 




Honorary President 
Acting President . 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Maccabeah Arenberg 

Leocadea Baranowski 

Mary Crowley 

Olive Smith 

Patricia Holmes 



This year Garden Club has endeavored to carry out an extensive and varied program 
which would prove both interesting and instructive. 

At the meetings held on alternate Thursdays a short business meeting was first conducted 
after which a talk was given by some member. Any phase of garden work could be pre- 
sented, so the range of subjects was a wide one. In the fall and winter months, time was 
provided for making cuttings and planting bulbs which were taken home when they had 
matured. In the spring this time was spent doing work in the garden. 

For our chapel program, we had as our guest Mr. Talbot, field agent of the Massachu- 
setts Audubon Society, who gave an illustrated lecture on "The Protection of Birds". In 
February, four members of the club presented a program showing the legendary background 
of the tulip, narcissus, laurel, and mistletoe. Four tableaux illustrating their legendary 
character were included. 

Besides our regular meetings, we have enjoyed several bonfire suppers in the garden 
and trips to Woods' Hole and the Blue Hills. Our social was conducted on even a bigger 
and better scale than those in past years. 

We have enjoyed our work this year and without question much of our success can be 
attributed to our faculty adviser and fellow-worker — Mr. Stearns. 

Olive Smith 



114 



ORGANIZATIONS 




3rd row— R. LAWTON, D. MENDELSON, M. CAMPBELL, A. TRIPP, E. GILLEN, B. TURNER, M. WANELIK. 

M. HARRINGTON. H. LINEMAN, M. COLLINS, A. NOYES, E. JOHNSON. B. SMITH, C. FIENDEL. 
2nd row— D. CLARNER.O. HOSFORD, A. TRIPP. M. VICKERS. R. RIDER. E. HIRTLE, F. BAKER, P.STEWART, 

E. BISCOE, H. MAXIM, E. MAXWELL, M. LEWIS. 
1st row— E. BEEDE, D.ALEXANDER, M.CROWLEY. O.SMITH, MR. STEARNS, L. BARANOWSKI, 

M. ARENBERG, A. LARSON, K. JOHNSON, E. DUPUIS. 

HOW PLANTS GET THEIR NAMES 



The romance of plant names has fascinated generations of herbalists, botanists and 
gardeners. It is quite as pleasant to know the origin and meaning of plant names as it is 
to recognize friends by name and to know their relationships and nationalities. 

Names of plants are derived from several sources: from the use of the plant, from the 
growing conditions, from religion, from animals with relation to their use, from men who 
discovered the plants in a strange part of the world, from countries, and very often from 
gardeners who have given them fanciful names without end. 

A most amusing story deals with the origin of the name "hawthorn". It was character- 
istic of landscape architecture in the days of "Capability" Brown to have long stretches of 
undulating lawns reaching to the house. On these lawns flocks of sheep were allowed to 
graze inasmuch as lawn mowers had not been invented. It was considered rather pleasant 
to have sheep wandering about on the lawn as it added to the scenery, but it was not de- 
sirable to have them stray upon the porches of houses; hence a sunken fence was devised 
some distance from the house. Because this sunken fence was hidden, a stroller would 
come upon it unaware and perhaps exclaim "ha! ha!" Since then the proper name for one 
of these sunken fences has been "haha". Then it was decided to have some sort of hedge 
planted at the bottom of this trench, and the plant chosen was ideally a thorny one. Hence 
the English native shrub used for this purpose was called the Haha Thorn, which was easily 
corrupted to our hawthorn. 

Many other stories such as this might be told to show how we obtain the delightful names 
forget-me-not, butter-cup, snowdrop, and mignonette (little darling); best of all is "pansy" 
from the French "pensee" meaning "thought". There is much simple pleasure to be found 
in knowing the names we give plants because we like them. 

Leocadia Baranowski 

115 



1933 ALPHA 




President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Stella Krupka 

Dorothy Alexander 

Eleanor Martin 

Olive Hosford 



The stress of modern life necessitates everyone's having a hobby. So say our human- 
nature experts. At Bridgewater, Hobby Club is the answer to such a statement. To be 
sure this club is one of the newest, but already its influence has been felt by the whole school; 
and its members have received enlightenment on a great variety of unique studies. Do 
you know how the postal system came about; that every type of seashell has a name and 
history; that "My Old Kentucky Home" was written about a particular house; or that the 
most expensive stamp in the world is the only one of its kind and is worth $50,000? In 
this its second year, Hobby Club has grown both in membership and prestige. May the 
years to come see it more outstanding and helpful to the college. 

Eleanor Martin 



116 



ORGANIZATIONS 




4th row— C. REILLY, E. HOLMES, C. FIENDEL, G. GRANT, F. QUIGLEY, J. STURTEVANT, B. ELLIS, A. HOUDE, 

A. McKEE, M. OSBORNE, P. CHACE, H. LINEHAN, A. PLAZA, L. BARANOWSKI, M. PRAY. 
3rd row— M. HANRAHAN, B. SMITH, E. HAZELGARDE, R. LAWTON, R. BRETTELL, A. LARSON, A. TRIPP, 

D. BOOTH. E. LANE, M. ARENBERG, C. BELL, D. BEARCE, M. MOORE, E. LAFAVEUR. N. PETERSON. 
2nd row— T. WOLFSON, C. GOLDING, E. MARTIN, O. HOSFORD, MR. STEARNS, S. KRUPKA, D. ALEXANDER, 

E. MURRAY, S. SOLMER. 

1st row— M. CARROLL, M. KEITH, L. GALIPEAU, F. GIBERTI. 



(to be sung by all) 
Oh, Hobby Club, we sing of you 
For much we've learned from thee, 
We have a hobby and we know 
That life is more worth-while. 
We work, we play, are always gay 
Just listen, world, to us, 
If you would always happy be 
Take heed of what we sing. 

Chorus 

Oh, have a hobby, hobby, hobby, hobby, 

Have a hobby, hobby, it's lots of fun, oh do. 

Stamp group 

The stamp group of Hobby Club 

With Mr. Stearns to lead, 

A lot has learned of stamps from him, 

From one another too. 

We sort our stamps and talk them o'er 

And all about them read. 

Postmarks we do also collect 

From places far and near. 

Poetry group 

Of poetry, we're very fond 

As you can easily see, 



HOBBY CLUB SONG 

We read the poems both old and new 
When we have time that's free. 
We watch, we wait, are always glad 
When Monday comes around 
For then it is we enjoy ourselves 
By reading poetry. 



117 



Nature group 

Of the nature group, to thee we sing 

Loyal members of the club, 

We pledge our service and our time 

In all natural things. 

Birds, flowers, and trees, 

Stars, moths and bees 

In fact we think it's fine 

To further learning in our schools 

Through meadow, field, and brook. 

We are the miscellaneous group 
All things we do collect 
From autographs to pottery 
And souvenirs and leaves 
Soap carving represents our art 
Interior decorating, too, 
Odd names another hobby is 
Collect all things we do. 



1933 ALPHA 




President 
Vice-Pres. 
Sec.-Treas. 



Kenneth Cameron 

Nathalie Thibault 

Grace Knox 



It was easy this year for Camera Club to find people interested in "kodaking as they 
go" to fill the places of those who graduated in June. 

The fundamentals of developing and printing having been mastered, we turned to new 
fields. Whenever an interesting exhibit or unique project was to be found anywhere about 
the school, you might well have expected to see a member of the Club busily adjusting his 
camera preparatory to taking a picture. 

The Club also finds much pleasure in supplying the students of the College with pictures 
of gymnasium, the campus, sport groups, and dormitory rooms, for the all-important "mem" 
book. 

One of the most interested and most co-operative club members is our friend and adviser, 
Mr. Paul Huffington. 

Grace Knox 



118 



ORGANIZATIONS 




row— H. HEARS, II. WORMWOOD, A. MAGNANT, II. BARKER, B. VINAL, P. LAMM, 
M. KELLY, MR. HUFFINGTON. 
dw— E. TARR, N. THIBEAULT, K. CAMERON, G. KNOX, M. CARROLL. 



THROUGH A STUDENT'S EYES 

Through constant contact with a person one cannot fail to gain impressions of him. I 
am sure, therefore, that everyone who has listened to Dr. Boyden's talks in Chapel has been 
impressed by some thought which unconsciously revealed something of the personality 
and interests of the speaker. 

I think, first of all, what impressed students, especially freshmen, was the pleasant, eager 
spirit of friendliness which was so vital a part of Dr. Boyden. What student in thinking 
of our President does not recall his generous smiles and infectious chuckles? 

From his Wednesday morning talks I realized how intensely interested in education Dr. 
Boyden was. He stressed the fact that standards are every day becoming higher, and con- 
sequently there will be room only for those students who are at the top. In his constant 
urgent appeal to everyone to make the most of his opportunity, Dr. Boyden has been a truly 
successful inspiration to the embryonic teachers of Bridgewater. 



119 



1933 ALPHA 




President 
Vice-Pres. 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Eleanor Meyer 

Olive Brittan 

Emily Bates 

Helen Murley 



Girl Scouting was first started at Bridgewater in 1921 and has since held a prominent 
place in the extra-curricula activities of our students. This year we tried to add to the 
"glories of the past" as well as carry on the work which had already been started. 

We were extremely fortunate in securing as our Councillor Miss Lucy B. Braley of the 
Training School. Her energy and enthusiasm have been a constant source of helpfulness 
to us all in carrying out our program. 

In the fall a Supper Hike afforded an opportunity for completing the tests of Fire Light- 
ing and Trail Making. At our Thursday night meetings we learned Morse Code Signaling 
and passed other tests for Second and First Class Rank. Under the supervision of Miss 
Mary I. Caldwell of the Physical Education Department we had an interesting course for 
the Athlete Merit Badge. 

Girl Scouting helps us to develop initiative and resourcefulness by providing an oppor- 
tunity to work individually on many different tests and proficiency badges such as Health 
Winner, Musician, Scribe, Junior Citizen, and Craftsman. In this work we have received 
much willing co-operation from Miss Caldwell, Miss Rand, Miss Davis, Miss Beckwith, 
and Mr. Arnold in their respective fields. 

Elinor Meyer, Olive Brittan, and Emily S. Bates attended a Girl Scout Leadership 
Training Course given by Miss Elizabeth Fiske, Director of Girl Scouts in Brockton, Mass. 
Miss Fiske kindly consented to address the student body in our chapel program March 28. 

Candidate Scouts were invested as Tenderfoot Scouts by Miss S. Elizabeth Pope, Dean 
of Women. We wish to thank Miss Pope for her interest and co-operation in making this 
year a success. 

Each year the Scouts have engaged in some profitable enterprise. This year we gave a 
Movie Benefit which proved a social as well as a financial success. 

We set a new standard in Scouting at Bridgewater by attending the annual State Re- 
view. With Miss Iva Lutz and Miss S. E. Pope as guests we witnessed and participated 
in the biggest event of the year in Scouting in Massachusetts. 

As a climax to our activities we held a Court of Awards at which badges were awarded 
for work completed during the year. It has been our aim to have every Candidate become a 
Tenderfoot Scout, every tenderfoot become a Second Class Scout, every Second Class Scout 
attain the rank of First Class, and every First Class Scout earn Proficiency Merit Badges. 

Emily Bates. 



120 



ORGANIZATIONS 



■luufto%_ Mg 


4^ r i 



3rd row— V. PRAIRIO, E. REYNOLDS, H. BARKER, H. CONNELL, I. KIMBALL. 

2nd row— E. MOURA, D. JONES, D. LOOK, O. MARTINI. C. IRELAND, R. HOCKENBERRY, 

B. CUSICK. 
1st row— MISS BRALEY, E. BATES, E. MEYER, O. BRITTON, H. MURLEY. 



The following paragraph was written by the sixth grade children in our Training School 
in memory of Dr. Boyden : 

"We all wanted to bring pennies for flowers for Dr. Boyden, and were glad, too, that they 
were a comfort to Mrs. Boyden. We shall remember Dr. Boyden a long time, and it will 
seem strange not to see him when we have our Memorial Day and Graduation exercises, 
and when we get our posture badges. We think that if each one of us tried to make as much 
of our life as he did of his, people would respect and honor us." 



121 



1933 ALPHA 




President 
Vice-Pre?. 

Secretary 
Treasurer 



Mildred Ferguson 

Elois Godfrey 

Virginia Cochrane 

Beatrice Turner 



Kindergarten Primary Club opened the year's events in October, with a Hallowe'en 
party for the new members. In November, two of our members were sent as delegates 
to the convention of the Massachusetts State Kindergarten Association at Newton. The 
November and December meetings were largely devoted to making and repairing Christmas 
gifts for the needy children of the town. On December 15th, a Christmas celebration was 
held. 

The club entertained the following speakers during the year: 

January; Mrs. French, Supervisor of Kindergartens in New Bedford. 
February; Speakers from the National Dairy Food Council, Boston, Mass. 
March; Miss Sophie Butler, Kindergarten of the Baldwin School in Brookline, Mass. 
April; Miss Frances Tredick, President of the Massachusetts State Kindergarten 
Association. 

Other phases of the year's program were the reading of educational books, and the aid- 
ing of handicapped children of the town. 

The program closed with the annual banquet in May at which time Miss Wheelock of 
the Wheelock Kindergarten School was guest speaker. 

Virginia Cochrane 



122 



ORGANIZATIONS 




3rd row — E. LANE, E. REYNOLDS, Z. MAPP, L. TOSI, H. BARKER, H. HALL, A. CRUISE, B. ELLIS, R. SWANSON, 

R. BUMPUS. 
2nd row— E. HAZELGARDE, H. FOYE. D. BOOTH, E. PARKER, R, TABOR, R. RIDER, B. RANDLETT, R. DIONNE, 

A. MORGAN, A. SMOLSKI, M. TIERNEY, Y. KELSEY. 

1st row— R. HOCKENBERRY, H.MAXIM, V.COCHRANE, M.FERGUSON. MISS MARKS, E.GODFREY, 

B. TURNER, D. WOODWARD, M. SMITH. 



DEFIANCE 

Rain drifts 

against 

the pane 

leaving 

everything 

blear. 

Dreams beat 

against 

my heart 

holding 

everything 

dear. 



E. K. Lewis 



123 



1933 ALPHA 




Director 

President 

Vice-Pres. 

Secretary 

Librarians 



Sopranos 
Allen, Mary 
Beach, Madeline 
Berezin, Ida 
Burr, Ruth 
Davis, Velma 
Dix, Barbara 
Dymowska, Bertha 
Fitzpatrick, Bertha 
French, Gertrude 
Hulstrom, Harriet 
Hunt, Beatrice 
Johnson, Helene 
Long, Hazel 
Mattson, Helen 
Maxim, Hazel 
McHugh, Loretta 
Nash, Marion 
Nugent, Ruth 
Stromdahl, Elizabeth 
Wanelik, Marion 
Waterhouse, Mary 
Woodward, Dorothy 



Abbott, Helen 
Albret, Barbara 
Amsden, Madeline 
Bliss, Phyllis 
Burrill, Harriet 
Clarner, Doris 
Dunn, Verda 
Eyre, Muriel 



Altos 
Fitts, Beatrice 
Gregory, Ruth 
Godfrey, Elois 
Grade, Doris 
Kennedy, Edna 
Kosmaler, Arlene 
Larcher, Carolyn 
MacGinnis, Doris 

124 



Miss Frieda Rand 

Polly Drevinsky 

Olive Smith 

Bernice Trulson 

Barbara Dix 

Ida Berezin 



Second Sopranos 
Anderson, Ruth 
Coleman, Priscilla 
Collins, Marion 
Cronin, Ruth 
Cushing, Rita 
Drevinsky, Polly 
Ferris, Ruth 
Flaherty, Ruth 
Freitas, Bessie 
Hockenberry, Reta 
Johnson, Edith 
Krupka, Stella 
Laramee, Mabel 
Lawrence, Elizabeth 
McKee, Ruth 
Nisula, Miriam 
Reynolds, Ernestine 
Salo, Mary 
Small, Helen 
Stockbridge, Barbara 
Trulson, Bernice 



Mathewson, Hazel 
Murley, Helen 
Portmore, Harriet 
Standish, Lillian 
Tilton, Mildred 
Smith, Lemira 
Smith, Olive 
Wormwood, Hazel 



ORGANIZATIONS 




4th row— R. ANDERSON, R. GREGORY, R. FERRIS, E. STROMDAHL, E. SMITH, E. JOHNSON. M. WANELIK, H. 

MATHEWSON, M. SALO, D. MacGINNIS, B. FITTS, H. ABBOTT, B. ALBRET. P. BLISS, H. HULSTROM, B. 

DYMOWSKA H. LONG. 
3rd row— E. GODFREY, R. FLAHERTY, E. KENNEDY, H. MURLEY. R. HOCKENBERRY, V. DUNN, E. REYNOLDS, 

A. KOSMALER, S. KRUPKA, M. COLLINS, R. CUSHING, G. FRENCH, R, CRONIN, L. McHUGH, H. SMALL, 

E. LAWRENCE, S. SIITONEN. 
2nd row— M. BEACH, M. WATERHOUSE, B. FREITAS, B. DIX. O. SMITH, MISS RAND, P. DREVINSKY, R. BURR, 

D. CLARNER, H., MAXIM, H. JOHNSON, D. WOODWARD, M. EYRE. 
1st row— M. LARAMEE., M. AMSDEN, H. PORTMORE, H. BURRILL, M.TILTON, B. HUNT, H. WORMWOOD, M. 

NISULA, R. NUGENT, M. ALLEN. 

No time was lost this last Fall in getting started, for the Glee Club had a year's work 
ahead of it. Try-outs were held to refill those vacancies caused by graduation. 

The club had its first appearance in October at the Plymouth County Teachers' Con- 
vention, and repeated its success of the year before. Following the usual custom, the Glee 
Club led the school in singing carols at the Christmas dinner, and after the faculty reception 
in the gymnasium, went down to Dr. Boyden's house for the annual carol sing, at his door- 
step. 

Then work began in earnest, for the spring concert was not far off when one reckoned by 
weeks. Assisted by a distinguished guest artist, the girls enjoyed their concert as much 
as did the audience. With graduation looming ahead, the music for Baccalaureate and 
Commencement exercises replaced Bach and Brahms and John Ireland. 

At the end of this well-rounded year's work, there is regret at the loss of those members 
who are graduating, and high hope for another year of singing comradeship. 

Bernice Trulson 



125 



1933 ALPHA 



PROGRAM OF THE SPRING CONCERT 

Assisted by Jesus Maria Sanroma 
Pianist 

Suscepit Israel (from the "Magnificat in D" 1 Bach 

With Drooping Wings Purcell 

Nymphs and Shepherds Purcell 

GLEE CLUB 

Piano solos by 
Jesus Maria Sanroma 

There is a Garden in Her Face Ireland 

Full Fathom Five Ireland 

O Can Ye Sew Cushions Bantock 

Piper's Song Boughton 

Song from Ossian's Fingal Brahms 

GLEE CLUB 

Piano solos by 
Jesus Maria Sanroma - 

Song of the Persian Captive Mabel Daniels 

The Lady of Dreams Mabel Daniels 

June Rhapsody Mabel Daniels 

GLEE CLUB 



126 






ORGANIZATIONS 



ft 



£% 



$ e 



it J 

il J^ S A 

4L1 4 l3 t. 



i# ^ 



3rr1 row— M. AMSDEN, II. MATHEWSON, B. FITTS, E. SMITH, R. GREGORY, B. HUNT, R. ANDERSON', 
2nd row— M. VVATKRIIOUSK. A. KOSMALER, P. BLISS, G. JACOBS, H. HULSTROM, E. GODFREY, 

V. DUNN. H. MURLEY. 
1st row— B. FREITAS. D. CLARNER, O. SMITH, MISS RAND, P. DREVINSKY, R. IIOCKENBERRY. 



CHOIR 



Junior Choir Leader — Olive Smith 



Sopranos : 
Harriet Hulstrom 
Beatrice Hunt 
Marion Nash 
Helen Small 
Bernice Trulson 
Dorothy Woodward 
Mary Waterhouse 



Madeleine Amsden 
Doris Clarner 
Beatrice Fitts 



Altos 
Bessie Freitas 
Eloise Godfrey 
Arline Kosmaler 



Second Sopranos: 
Ruth Anderson 
Phyllis Bliss 
Polly Drevinsky 
Reta Hockenberry 
Grace Jacobs 
Hazel Mathewson 
Helen Mattson 
Ruth Gregory 



Helen Murley 
Lemira Smith 
Olive Smith 



The choir gives no social in the gym, displays no posters, and makes no chapel announce- 
ments, yet it is one of the integral parts of extra-curricula activity. It is representative 
of the entire student body since any commuter or dormitory girl may try for membership 
regardless of whether or not she belongs to glee club. By sharing its talent with the stu- 
dents every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, when it furnishes the music for chapel, this 
group proves itself a worthwhile organization. 

Olive Smith 



127 



1933 ALPHA 




President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 

Librarians 



L. Victor Milici 

John S. Bates 

George Jacobsen 

Samuel Gregory 

Harold Brewer 

Francis Moran 



The Men's Glee Club is not the possessor of a historical background of prestige and 
tradition, for no organization of that name existed in Bridgewater Normal School before 
1923. When it was formed, it was only for a short time, for seven years ago the group was 
compelled to disband. Not until last year, when our institution became a Teachers College, 
was the club formed again. 

Each of the men's classes had its quota of musical talent, but the class of 1935 was par- 
ticularly blessed with harmonious voices. Mainly through the efforts of this class the 
organization took on new life and presented a fine concert in May of 1932 under the guidance 
of Miss Rand. 

Interest among the men has increased, so that prospects for our April concert this year 
appear bright. We are receiving full support from the student body. All plans are being 
carried out in a capable manner by our president, Milici. 

The Men's Quartette has proved to be an excellent drawing card at socials. We are 
fortunate also in having on our roll call an eminent soloist, Ralph Creedon. 

We feel some of the success of our club may be attributed to the hearty support received 
from the student body. 



128 



ORGANIZATIONS 




3rd row— A. LEWIS, S. LOVETT, K. BLAIR. W. NARDELI.I, K. MURPHY, E. JOHNSON. 

2nd row— MISS RAND, J. CASTLE. R. COOK, R. HANCOCK, G. HIGGINS. O. KIERNAN. K. COOMRS, 

C. CALLAHAN, T. MICHELSON. 
1st row— H. BREWER. M. COHEN, I. HATES. V. MILICI. S. GREGORY, G. JACOBSON, T. MacMAHON, 

V. MORAN. 



First Tenors 

Blair, C. 
Callahan, C. 
Cohen, M. 
Hancock, R. 
Higgins, G. 



Second Tenors 

Brewer, H. 
Casey, P. 
Gregory, S. 
Kiernan, O. 
Michelson, T. 
Milici, V. 
Moran, F. 
Rose, C. 
Welch, D. 



First Basses 

Bradbury, W. 
Cadwell, H. 
Castle, J. 
Cook, R. 
Creedon, R. 
Lewis, A. 
Johnson, E. 
Nardelli, W. 
Spracklin, H. 



Second Basses 

Bates, J. 
Cameron, W. 
Coombs, K. 
Jacobsen, G. 
Lovett, S. 
McMahon, F. 
Murphy, K. 
Nolan, J. 



129 



1933 ALPHA 




We welcomed many new members into our group this year which necessitated our re- 
moval from the Music Room to the Auditorium for our rehearsals. Our year's work was 
centered around Schubert's "Unfinished Symphony", the main feature of our concert which 
took place March 10, with George Abercrombie, Pianist, assisting as guest artist. We have 
assisted the Dramatic Clubs during their various productions this year, as well as playing 
for the student body during a Chapel period in February. 

Although the orchestra is not a social organization, we find real enjoyment in playing 
together simply for the love of music. Our long evening rehearsals which preceded the 
concert were often broken up by a tasty mint to gain energy for more and deeper thought. 
We have all found great joy in music work this year which has been carried on, as usual, 
under the able direction of Miss Rand, whose untiring efforts and inspiration have been so 
unselfishly given. 

Beatrice V. Fitts 



130 



ORGANIZATIONS 




Standing:— A- GUTMAN, B. FITTS, O.SMITH, MISS RAND. G. JACOBSEN, A.LEWIS, F. MORAN, P. OLENICK. 

Left to Right Seated:— R. BUMPUS, A. LEARY, M.COHEN. M. LARAMEE, V. NAVEROUSKIS. (Concert Master), S.GREG- 
ORY, H. MURLEY, B. ALBRET, D. CLARNER, R. VANCAMPEN, R. TURNER, H. BAPTISTE, A. KOSMALER, 
M. CUSHMAN, E. THORLEY, H.RUSSELL, H. HEIKKILA, M. CUSHMAN, E. BERNIER, T. MICHELSON. 



Conductor — Frieda Rand 

Board of Directors 
Vincent Naverouskis Olive Smith 

Librarians 
George Jacobsen 



Violins 
Naverouskis, V., concert master 
Albret, B. White, E. 
Gregory, S. Gutman, A. 
Heikkila, H. Cushman, M. E. 
Leary, A. Cushman, M. M. 
Scott, M. Turner, R. 
Kosmaler, A. Russell, H. 
Laramee, M. Cohen, M. 
Bumpus, R. 



sen 


Marion Scott 




Secretary 






Beatrice Fitts 






Personnel 






Viola 


Clarinets 


Horn 


Standish, L. 


Clarner, D. 


Bernier, E. 




Baptiste, H. 


Trombone 


Cello 
Albret, B. 
Fitts, B. 


VanCampen, R. 
Bassoon 


Lewis, A. 

Saxophone 
Thorley, E. 


Bass 


Baptiste, H. 


Drums 


Fitts, B. 


Trumpet 


Jacobsen, G. 
Moran, F. 


Flute 


Michelson, T. 


Piano 


Murley, H. 


Olenick, P. 


Smith, 0. 



131 



1933 ALPHA 




WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

W. A. A.'s initial year as a club in the Teachers College at Bridgewater was also its 
tenth anniversary, and one hundred percent membership was pledged in the freshman class. 
This was the result of an energetic membership drive launched by W. A. A. representatives. 

At the fall meeting, health rules occupied a conspicuous place, when a student from Bates 
College, Maine, presented the views of her fellow students on the subject. Under the direc- 
tion of Eleanor Meyer health rules were very much improved and were adopted by a large 
percent of the members. 

Saturday mornings during the Fall saw the lower campus occupied by hockey and soccer 
enthusiasts, for W. A. A. decided to come to the rescue of activity-seeking week-enders by 
presenting a program of sports. 

The revision of the constitution and point systems was completed, credit now being 
given for special classes, and individual and team athletic participation. 

The winter sports culminated in the season Meet, one feature of which was a contest 
among divisions in the keeping of health rules. The climax of the meet was the distribution 
of pin awards for W. A. A. activities. 

Campus Carnival took the form of an English Festival this year, a may-pole and country 
dancing adding gaiety and color to the scene. 

A Health Week in the Spring replaced the usual Spring Meet and W. A. A. now took 
inventory and found it had reason to celebrate its tenth birthday exuberantly. Not only 
had it made intra-mural sports the accepted thing at our College, but through play-days 
it had spread the doctrine to neighboring towns. 

W. A. A. has added to its program yearly, till it now ranks among the first in the variety 
of sports which it offers; and it has won the interest and admiration of many athletic asso- 
ciations through its system of student coaching. 

Mary E. Crowley 



132 



ORGANIZATIONS 




3rd row— O. McMURDIE, R. FERRIS, E. IOIINSON, L. SMITH, D. MacGINNIS, G. HEXRIKSEX, E. St' 1 1 REI HICK, 

O. BRITTAN. 
2nd row— D. CLARNER, A. TRIPP, E. MEYER, B. RENZI, E. BEANEj E. GODFREY, A. MITCHELL, 

E. TAYLOR. 
1st row— H. BROWN, E. TARR, MISS DECKER, M. ALLEN. MISS CALDWELL. M. CROWLEY, G. BARNES. 



President 
Vice-President 
Corresponding Secretary 
Recording Secretary 
Treasurer 



Head 
Head 
Head 
Head 
Head 
Head 
Head 
Head 
Head 
Head 
Head 
Head 
Head 
Head 
Head 



MEMBERS OF W. A. A 



of Health 

of Hikes 

of Hockey 

of Soccer 

of Tennis 

of Archery 

of Volley Ball 

of Tennikoit 

of Golf 

of Dancing 

of Basketball 

of Track and Field 

of Baseball 

of Bowling 

of Campus Carnival 



BOARD 



Mary Allen 

. Esther Tarr 

Mary Crowley 

. Grace Knox 

Gertrude Barnes 



Eleanor Meyer 

Ruth Ferris 

Beatrice Renzi 

Gunvor Henricksen 

Eleanor Schreiber 

Lemira Smith 

Elois Godfrey 

Evelyn Beane 

. Anna Tripp 

Esther Lindberg 

Elsie Taylor 

Ruth Rider 

Aloyse Mitchell 

Ella Lewis 

Alice Magnant 



133 



1933 ALPHA 



N. A. A. COUNCIL 



President 
Vice-Pres. 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



C. B. Johnson 

. G. Lowder 

H. Spracklin 

C. Aherne 



The N. A. A. Council, made up of officers of the organization and an elected repre- 
sentative from each class, handled all the business of the association. It acted as the spon- 
sor of the second annual Boys' Sports Day. Many of the schools in which our junior men 
trained were represented, so that a good-sized group was present to take part in the new mass 
games on the program. 

Through the endeavors of the Council, the evening of February fourth found the gym 
the scene of the N. A. A. formal dance. The men of the school and their guests literally 
floated in a gondola through the streets of Venice to the tune of McCarty's Revelers. Since 
the usual sports of basketball, baseball, and soccer have received their share of attention 
we can conclude that N. A. A. has carried out a well-rounded program of athletic, and social 
activities. 

R. J. Nagle 




-C. CALLAHAN. W. NUGENT, C AHERNE. 

-G. LOWDER, MR. KELLY, E. WELCH, R. NAGLE. 



134 



ORGANIZATIONS 




2nd row— R. NAGLE 

J. SWEENEY. 
1st row— J. MOREY, G. LOWDER 



FORD, O. KIERNAN, S. OLENICK, D. KELLY, F. MacMAHON, 

WELCH, F. BAILEY, M. BRADBURY. 



BASKETBALL 



Captain 

Manager 



Edward Welch 
Robert J. Nagle 



With a selected squad of high school stars, together with the returning varsity men, 
we started our practice season late in November under the competent guidance of our Cap- 
tain and Coach Eddie Welch. Without a doubt we faced a very tough schedule and here 
is what Eddie and his boys did to it. 

Before Christmas vacation, we had fallen before Rhode Island State and Clark Uni- 
versity. After vacation our luck stayed the same and an exceptionally strong Farmington 
team eked out a win over us. Then things changed ; we trounced Boston University, did a 
job on Harvard Junior Varsity, continued the good work by beating Assumption College 
at Worcester, and ended our home season by trimming Tufts. Our last outside game re- 
sulted in a win for us when we trimmed the Newport Training College. 

While the season was glorious in one respect it is certainly very sad in another. Why? 
Because the one and only "Pest" Welch has played his last game for B. T. C. For four 
years he has held spectators spellbound and has saved many a game for the college. For 
the last two years he has been our Captain and Coach and if the team can find any two men 



135 



1933 ALPHA 



to fill his shoes, they should consider themselves fortunate. Still we must not forget that 
other four-year veteran and runner-up in scoring honors, none other than George Lowder. 
George was second only because Eddie Welch was on the same team. The rest of the team 
was made up of Fred Bailey, a newcomer to the Senior ranks who proved to be the back- 
bone of our defense, and Will Bradbury and Dan Kelly, both freshmen who made the first 
squad. We cannot leave out that versatile junior, Joe Morey, who has consistently been 
one of the best. This season is the last for Frank McMahon, Clifford Johnson, and Paul 
Ford, who have played the role of first string subs in a manner worthy of the highest praise. 



Schedule and Scores 



B. T. C. 


27 


R. I. State 


B. T. C. 


38 


Clark 


B. T. C. 


38 


Farmington 


B. T. C. 


28 


Assumption 


B. T. C. 


48 


Harvard 


B. T. C. 


71 


B. U. 


B. T. C. 


37 


Fitchburg 


B. T. C. 


38 


Tufts 


B. T. C. 


52 


Newport Ti 



70 
41 
48 
24 
38 
45 
42 
34 



136 



ORGANIZATIONS 




yrd row— D. KELLY, W. BRADBURY. P. HILL, S. GREGORY. 

2nd row— II. SPRACKLIN, G. MORRIS. G. LOWDER, K. COOMBS, K. MURPHY, J. SWEENEY. 

1st row— E. MacMAHON, V. MILIC1. VV. NARDELLI, R. NAGLE, G. HIGGINS, V. NAVEROUSKIS, E. JOHNSON. 

SOCCER 
Captain . . Walter Nardelli Manager . . . Robert Nagle 

With a small but faithful squad which was coached by "Butch" Nardelli and Bob Nagle 
we went through the season under many difficulties. We were again handicapped by the 
lack of a good practice ground which is the only reason for our many defeats. However, 
before we had played many games it was evident that we had developed a smooth passing 
team that could take a beating gracefully. When posterity looks over our schedule and 
notices our scores, I am afraid they will think we were a failure as a soccer team; but let 
it be remembered that deep down in our hearts has been engraved that famous saying, 
"It matters not whether you win or lose, it's how you play the game." 

The little goal-getting we did do this year was confined to "Bob" Nagle, veteran of 
four years, and Jack Nolan, a newcomer to our ranks. 

The alumni game of this year marked the last appearance of our team. It also drew 
to a finish the career of George Lowder, one of the three men who has played four years, 
Nardelli and Nagle being the other two. McMahon, Naverouskis, Milici, Clifford Johnson, 
Ford, and Eddie Welch will also be among the missing when the next soccer season rolls around. 

Dan Kelly has been elected to lead our team next year, and with nine members return- 
ing, the school may look forward to a more successful season. 
Scores: B. T. C. Harvard 5 B. T. C. 1 M. I. T. 3 

B. T. C. 1 Tufts 2 B. T. C. Conn. Aggies 2 

B. T. C. 1 "Fitchburg 4 B. T. C. 1 Alumni 1 



137 



1933 ALPHA 



BASEBALL , 

1932 1933 

Captain . . . Frank Desmond Captain . . Charles Aherne 

Manager . . . Robert J. Nagle Manager . . . Robert J. Nagle 

Our last season with Frank Desmond as a coach was a most successful one. We went 
down to defeat but once, and to offset that we trimmed such teams as St. Marks Prepara- 
tory School, Moses Brown Academy, Newport Training Station, and last but not least, 
Fitchburg Teachers College by the score of three to one. 

This year we are fortunate in having a schedule which would do honor to any college. 
The returning veterans this year, Dudy Aherne, our captain and coach, together with such 
stars as Eddie Welch, Joe Teeling, Joe Morey, Owen Kiernan, and many others were of 
great assistance last season. 

Our schedule for the coming season includes such college-caliber teams as: 

Rhode Island State College Clark University 

Fitchburg Teachers College Thayer Academy 

Assumption College Moses Brown Academy 

Providence College Naval Training Station 



IN MEMORIAM 

CALVIN COOLIDGE 

Though the hour of his earth work was over 
Still the world in its grief had the thought 
That he'd worried and struggled and labored 
For a nation whose heart was his heart ; 
With the task of his life well accomplished, 
When all weary he needed to rest — 
Then the Father above in His kindness 
Called him home to those hills he loved best. 



Anna Ginnetty 



138 



BUILDINGS 




139 



1933 ALPHA 



Social Calendar 



September 


16 


Acquaintance Social 


September 


23 


Church Socials 


September 30 


Social Activities Dance 


October 


7 


Woodward Dormitory Bridge Party 


October 


14 


Gates House Social 


October 


21 


Senior Social 


October 


28 


Long Weekend (Teachers' Convention) 


November 


4 


Sophomore Social 


November 


11 


Long Weekend 


November 


18 


Dramatic Club Plays 


November 


19 


Alumni Tea-Dance 


November 


25-28 


Thanksgiving Recess 


December 


2 


Student Co-operative Formal Dance 


December 


9 


Amateur Night 
End of first term 


December 


16 


Christmas Fund Social 


December 


22 


Christmas Dinner and Party 


December 


23-Jan 


3 Christmas Vacation 


January 


6 


Junior-Sophomore Prom. 


January 


13 


Men's Club Social 


January 


27 


Day Students' Social 


February 


4 


N. A. A. Formal Dance 


February 


10 


Men's Club Play 


February 


17-24 


Vacation 


March 


3 


Junior Social 


March 


10 


Orchestra Concert 


March 


17 


Freshman Social 


March 


31 


Library Club Social 


April 


7 


Men's Glee Club Concert 


April 


14-21 


Vacation 


April 


28 


Women's Glee Club Concert 


April 


29 


Student Co-operative Formal Dance 


May 


5 


Garden Club Social 


May 


19 


Dramatic Club Play 


May 


20 


Alpha Dance 


June 


2 


Campus Carnival 


June 


9 


Senior Prom 


June 


10 


Biennial 


June 


16 


Faculty Reception 


June 


18 


Baccalaureate 


June 


19 


Graduation 



140 



1933 ALPHA 





^58s. 


PKU6L 1 .r-v 




r-H 





IN MEMORIAM 

DR. ARTHUR CLARKE BOYDEN 

BRIDGEWATER, MASSACHUSETTS 

APRIL 21, 1933 

Address Delivered by Frank W. Wright 

Deputy-Commissioner of Education 

Horace Mann, whose spirit hovers over this and all similar institutions in our country, 
closed his last public address, the baccalaureate sermon at Antioch College in June 1859, 
with these words: "Be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity." 

Fitting indeed, are these words as we assemble to pay tribute to the memory of one 
who carried forward the great work begun on this campus by Horace Mann nearly a century 
ago. Arthur Clarke Boyden was a true exemplar of a great leader and a worthy successor 
in the development of our State program of teacher training. A span of life of more than 
four score years was allotted to him, and it was spent unselfishly in the service of the children 
of Massachusetts. To him it was truly given to "win some victory for humanity." 

The life and service of an institution are, in a very real sense, but the lengthened shadow 
of those who have shared in the guiding of its destinies. Many hands and many minds 
have united in the creation of this splendid school. Leading all the rest are father and son, 
Albert G. Boyden and Arthur Clarke Boyden. Albert G. Boyden became principal of the 
State Normal School at Bridgewater in 1860. He was succeeded in that capacity by his 
son in 1906. This span of seventy-three years of leadership of a single institution by father 
and son is probably unparalleled in the annals of American Education. 

On March 15, at ten o'clock P. M., Arthur Clarke Boyden laid down what, in the most 
literal sense, had been his life work. At his desk almost to the end, he gave himself un- 
reservedly to this institution, and finished his work surrounded by the associations that 
had been to him the breath of life itself. As was said by a friend: "He stepped off from the 
summit, his laurels undiminished and his lights undimmed." 

On the simple stone that marks the grave of Horace Mann in the Old North Burying 
Ground in Providence is this inscription : "Whatever is excellent as God lives is permanent." 
All about us, here and throughout the State, is the enduring evidence of the work of Dr. 
Boyden; work that was to the last degree excellent, and, therefore, permanent in the 



142 



PROSE 



influence it exerted upon the thousands who were taught by him, and who, taught, and 
teaching, tens of thousands of our children. 

Since the founding of this institution, 7,562 persons have been graduated and have gone 
out to exemplify its traditional service to the youth of the State that created and supports 
it. Of these, 4,021 left Bridgewater during the administrative leadership of Dr. Boyden, 
inspired with the zeal and devotion of a great teacher. Who can measure the span of his 
influence, transmitted through four thousand sons and daughters of Bridgewater who sat 
at his feet? 

A graduate of Bridgewater thus appraised this influence: "Thousands of Bridgewater 
graduates, when they think of Dr. Boyden, will instinctively recall him as a master teacher. 
His quiet forcefulness, unfailing fairness, even disposition, keen sense of humor, and high 
Christian character, all marked him as a great leader of men. It is as a teacher that we 
love to think of him. For clear, logical organization of subject matter he was unmatched. 
His mastery of his subject was absolute. One left his class with a new understanding of 
what it means to be a true teacher, and with a firm resolve to emulate him. His former 
students face their daily task with a surer purpose, a finer courage, and a greater devotion 
because he was their teacher." 

For more than sixteen years, I was privileged to come into the most intimate contact 
with Dr. Boyden in his administration of this Teachers College. Never was there finer dem- 
onstration of loyalty to a cause larger than, and outside, one's self. Bridgewater was his 
loyalty and his life. In sunshine or in shadow, he held unswervingly to one purpose: the 
welfare of this institution and its greater service to the State. A devastating fire left him 
unshaken, and from the ashes of the old he was to see arise the new and greater Bridgewater 
of which he dreamed and often spoke, and which he so much helped to build. When Dr. 
Boyden became principal in 1906, the enrollment was 250. He lived to see this institution 
grow to its present enrollment of 588. During his administration the courses were ex- 
tended, the new plant erected, the name changed, and degrees first granted. "Look about 
you for his monument", was never more aptly spoken of any man than of Arthur Clarke 
Boyden, here and now. 

One of his associates in the administration of our State Teachers Colleges aptly phrased 
Dr. Boyden's more than a quarter of a century as principal and president when he said : 
"I have had the opportunity to observe Dr. Boyden's relations with five different State 
administrations and with his colleagues who have held positions as principals and presidents 
of the normal schools and teachers colleges in Massachusetts. During this entire period, 
his sound judgment, his wide background of experience, and his fine professional spirit made 
for him a position of influence which we have all recognized. We admired and respected 
him as a professional leader, and we loved him as a man." 

"Not to be ministered unto, but to minister" is the motto of this institution engraved on a 
bronze tablet as you enter its portals. Daily, as he came to his work, Dr. Boyden passed 
beneath this silent and enduring statement of what was likewise his own mission in life. 
In his talks to students from this platform, in his annual Sunday afternoon address to seniors 
preceding graduation, in his beautifully interpretive reading of the morning lesson in daily 
assembly there shone forth the deep religious nature of Dr. Boyden, and the ministering 
spirit of the Great Teacher whom he devoutly followed. 

143 



1933 ALPHA 



As a life-long resident of the Town of Bridgewater, Dr. Boyden came to be its best-known 
citizen. Unselfishly he gave of his time and energy to his town and to his church. Quiet 
and unobtrusive in public demeanor, he was, nevertheless, readily enlisted in any good 
cause. Boyden and Bridgewater — man, community and school — are almost synonymous 
terms. For years to come, the naming of one will suggest the other. 

Well do I remember his almost shy request that I assume his duties at graduation in 
June, 1927, in order that he might be at Amherst College, where an honorary degree was to 
be conferred upon him by his Alma Mater. I quote the highly appropriate citation by 
President George G. Olds of Amherst in conferring this degree: 

"Arthur Clarke Boyden, Principal of the State Normal School at Bridgewater, Massa- 
chusetts, graduate of Amherst in the class of 1876 ; with more than half a century of active 
service behind you; of a family of great teachers; head of an institution which has served 
as pattern and guide for all schools of its kind ; training teachers for our Commonwealth 
and thus preparing young men and women for the greatest profession in the world; a man 
honored by the unstinted appreciation of your colleagues and recognized because of your 
words and acts in the front ranks of our educators ; it gives me pleasure to confer upon you 
the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters." 

In 1919, as a labor of love by a grateful son in memory of a revered father, Dr. Boyden 
prepared a memorial volume entitled: "Albert Gardner Boyden and the Bridgewater State 
Normal School." 

There exists in manuscript form an illuminating treatise entitled: "Bridgewater State 
Teachers College, an Interpretation", prepared by Arthur Clarke Boyden. This is soon 
to be published by the Alumni Association, and will serve both as a complete record of this 
institution from its founding to the present, and as a memorial volume to its fourth principal 
and president. It was my privilege to examine this manuscript a year ago and again within 
the last few days. In closing may I quote its closing paragraph which seems to epitomize 
the philosophy of life of him whose passing we so greatly lament, and whose memory we 
honor in these exercises. This paragraph reads as follows: 

"An Institution with Ideals: From its earliest history this school has had an ideal of 
the teacher that is very high. The teaching of children and youth through the formative 
years is a God-given privilege, and only the heart, mind, and soul that is attuned to the 
Infinite can fulfill this obligation." 

Arthur Clarke Boyden has gone from our midst, but the record of his life and work is 
stamped indelibly on our minds and hearts. There abides the fragrant memory of one of 
God's noblemen. 



144 



PROSE 



TRIBUTE TO DOCTOR ARTHUR CLARKE BOYDEN 

May 7, 1931, at South Shore Country Club, Hinghara, Massachusetts, at a Faculty Dinner given in 

Recognition of Dr. Boyden's Twenty-Fifth Anniversary as Principal of 

Bridgewater Normal School. 

Forty-five years ago next September, when I entered Bridgewater Normal School as a 
student, Dr. Boyden had already served seven years on our teaching staff. He has contin- 
ued without interruption to the present time — as teacher seventeen years, as teacher and 
Vice-Principal ten years, as Principal twenty-five years — a grand total of fifty-two years! 

During these years of teaching Dr. Boyden — or "A. C", as we commonly called him — was 
the Live Wire of the faculty. He was universally respected, loved, and idolized by his pupils. 

We liked his teaching because of his masterly handling of the subject and of the class. 
He did not seem to overstress methods and devices, but gave us the impression that the 
subject matter itself was important! Then, too, he had a technique of teaching that was a 
joy and a delight. We worked harder, without complaint, than for any other teacher I 
have ever known. Unlike many teachers he was willing to answer questions, and he in- 
stantly recognized and encouraged every bit of real effort made by his pupils. 

We discovered early that he never lagged in the educational procession, but was always 
found in the vanguard of progress. 

Dr. Boyden was fortunate in his ancestry, in the schools he attended, the teachers he 
had over him, and in the combination of subjects he taught for many years — science, his- 
tory, civics, and education, a perfect combination for breadth, depth, clear thinking, and 
outlook; but large credit for his successes must be given to his ambition to serve greatly, 
to his achieving will, and to hard work. 

We rejoice that he is at the helm, still in the prime of his powers, and we wish for him 
many more years of active leadership in our school. Harlan P Shaw 

A TRIBUTE TO DOCTOR BOYDEN 

in Recognition of his First Year as President of the State Teachers College at Bridgewater. 

Another year has passed since the foregoing tribute to Dr. Boyden was given by Mr. 
Shaw. The student body in recognition of Dr. Boyden's first anniversary as President of 
the State Teachers College at Bridgewater dedicates this tribute: 

The transition period from Normal School to State Teachers College was successfully 
attained chiefly through the earnest efforts of Dr. Boyden to impress upon the student body 
the importance of the teaching profession in the modern trends of civilization. 

The students have learned to anticipate, early in their school career, his concise, vivid, 
informal talks on phases of educational problems now confronting the thinking people of 
the world. Dr. Boyden commands respect and sincere admiration in his wholehearted 
interest in all the attempts of the student body, both as a group and individually. 

The graduating members have come to look forward with great pleasure to the time 
when they shall be under his guidance in the study of the "History of Education". Surely, 
53 years of service in the profession have provided Dr. Boyden with a rich background which 
he generously shares with the students. 

The alumni come back eagerly to conferences and conventions to renew and further 
their experiences in the educational field. 

Suffice it to say that the faculty and the student body has the opportunity to have con- 
stantly before them the excellent example of a most successful "Teacher and Friend to Man". 

Helen L. Foye 

The foregoing "Tributes" to Dr. Boyden tell of his place in the lives and hearts of his 
associates and students. 

And now, just before this book goes to press, we must record the sad fact that Dr. Boy- 
den is no longer with us. But his spirit will long be felt in the school over which he has so 
capably presided. May we each carry with us the inspiration of his teaching and example. 

145 



1933 ALPHA 



THE NANCY ROMANCE 

A legend of Crawford Notch 

About a quarter of a mile south of Notchland at Bemis station, a small stream called 
Nancy Brook crosses the highway under an iron bridge and enters the Saco beyond the rail- 
road, having its source high up on Mt. Nancy at the west. With this brook is connected a 
tragic tale from which both mountain and brook get their names. 

The story — which is true — relates that one Nancy Barton came to Jefferson, N. H., 
with Colonel Whipple, as a servant in the family. While here she became engaged to a 
farm hand of the Colonel's who had completely won her affections. The wedding day 
was finally set, the year being 1778, with Portsmouth as the place. Nancy, after entrust- 
ing her two years' savings to her lover, went to Lancaster to make certain preparations for 
the event. During her temporary absence her perfidious lover left for Portsmouth, leav- 
ing no explanation nor any message for the girl of his betrothal. Stunned by the news, 
on her return at night, she decided at once to follow him, and in spite of all warnings and 
entreaties set out on foot in hopes of overtaking him before dawn at his probable camp in 
the Notch. The month was December, snow had already fallen, and a biting west 
wind was blowing. It was 30 miles to the first settlement in the Notch with but little road 
through the wilderness other than a hunter's path marked by spotted trees. On through 
the awful night she pressed only to arrive at the hard sought camp after her lover had left, 
finding the ashes of his fire still warm. Nothing daunted she again pressed on, cold, wet, 
and famishing, clambering through the wild pass of the Notch which only one woman before 
had ever passed, toiling through deep snows, over rocks and fallen trees, fording the tur- 
bulent and frozen Saco, until at last utterly exhausted by her superhuman efforts, she sank 
down at the foot of an aged tree on the bank of the brook that now bears her name, not 
far from Nancy's Bridge. Here her body was found wrapped in her cloak but cold and stiff 
in death on her nuptial couch amid the snow, not many hours afterward, by a party of 
men who, alarmed for her safety, had followed her from Colonel Whipple's. 

The sequel to all this is, that her unfaithful lover, Jim Swindell, on hearing of her suffer- 
ings and awful death, became insane, and afterwards died a raving maniac. Sixty years 
ago or less there were still those who believed that often on still nights in the valley around 
the scene of her decease, the mountain walls echoed with the shrieks and groans of the rest- 
less ghost of Nancy's faithless lover. 

The tablet placed on her grave by Mrs. Charles H. Morey, Anna Stickney Chapter, 
D. A. R., in 1912, can be seen a few rods up from Nancy Bridge. 

Grace A. Jacobs 

This legend was rewritten from "Chronicles of the White Mountains" by J. W. Kil- 
bourne. 



146 



PROSE 



MY HARBOR 

One morning in New York early last July, I was fermenting in exile. Arriving to spend 
the whole weary summer in the notorious big city, I had come carrying a picture of Boston 
Common in one hand and a return timetable in the other; for I am a New Englander, and 
in my mind Beacon Hill is a Mecca while New York has always been synonymous with 
cheapness, grossness, and noise. It was in this frame of mind that I listened to the superin- 
tendent of our boarding house — which is located at St. George on Staten Island — telling 
me that the roof was open to tenants, and that the view was excellent because we were on 
top of a hill in the middle of the harbor. "Is the hill so high that I can see the South Sta- 
tion?" I scoffed. Since there seemed to be nothing else to do, however, I went up to look. 

Finding the roof hot and dirty, I decided immediately to go downstairs again. I paused 
for a moment by the parapet, nevertheless, just to be able to say that I had seen the view. 
Two hours later I stood there still; on the morrow I visited the roof again, likewise on the 
next day, and all the days that followed. At first I did this without knowing why; then I 
began to realize that I enjoyed it. Thus a New Englander became satisfied in a new land, 
and he is still wondering what powers worked the miracle, — still trying to explain what 
happened to him. 

Perhaps the view from St. George is its own justification for what it did to me. 

The only fixed object on the water itself is the lighthouse on Robbin's Reef, just off 
St. George; everything else is afloat, and comes and goes. First there are the big liners 
that pass up and down the bay. One afternoon the new Manhattan of the United States 
Lines, Captain George Freid in command, entered the harbor on her maiden voyage and 
the Akron flew overhead to pay her homage. The next morning the Berengaria, Bremen, 
and Majestic steamed out through the Narrows all in line, looming up so large that Brooklyn 
disappeared behind their funnels. The excursion steamers, most of which are bound for 
Coney Island, or Sandy Hook, form a second group. A Coney Island boat passes once 
every hour — a little ship of a few hundred tons, with a big paddle wheel and a romantic 
name such as Pegasus, Sirins, or Osiris. Constantly weaving back and forth across these 
lines is a third factor of the traffic, the ferries, remarkable crafts that seem to move for- 
ward, backward, or even sidewise with equal agility. These three classes of ships having 
established courses constitute about one-half of the harbor traffic; the rest is made up of 
oil-tankers, freighters, tramps, tugs, barges loaded with freight cars, a few intrepid motor- 
boats, and several other nondescript craft "left-over and unclassified." 

It is in the late afternoon that this maze of traffic is most impressive; then it reaches 
its greatest volume, and the setting sun shining on the western sides of the ships makes 
it so clear when viewed from Staten Island, that with field glasses one can read the name 
on an ordinary vessel anywhere in the harbor. At five o'clock we distinguish the Boston 
boat as it swings up the East River; and at this time of day I identified the Myles Slandish, 
a Boston Harbor excursion steamer that I had not seen since childhood, rounding the Bat- 
tery five miles away. The twilight hour has its advantages, too. It is perhaps the love- 
liest time; for then the factory chimneys have ceased smoking, the hurrying ships have made 
port, the sparkling waves have settled down to wait for the moon to rise, and the fading 
sunset bathes the bosom of the harbor and the curves of the far shore in lavender and old 
rose. Then again when real darkness comes, the scene becomes what is certainly the most 

147 



1933 ALPHA 



wonderful night-time spectacle I have ever beheld. Lighthouses and buoys flash white, 
red, and green over the water, while ferries and other small craft are lighted brightly; on 
the further shore the Statue of Liberty is floodlighted, skyscrapers in Manhattan show air- 
plane beacons, electric signs flash in Brooklyn, and the Bay Ridge Parkway traces out the 
shore line; while close at hand in Bayonne the Standard Oil piers are illuminated like Christ- 
mas trees; and occasionally fireworks sent up from far away at Coney Island augment the 
display. Only fog shuts out the sight; and even then the sounds have interest: at regular 
intervals there comes the single note from Robbins' Reef, while occasionally a long blast 
followed by two short ones is heard and we know a tug towing two barges is out there some- 
where in the grayness. 

I have spoken of how the harbor changes from time to time; yet there is an element 
about it that is ever the same. Standing here, one feels that he is in the presence of great- 
ness. There is in the air a glory that points to the magnificence that man has here achieved, 
and a tension that whispers of forces struggling toward something more; yet there is in 
the air a restfulness that speaks of the smile of nature on the whole affair, and of the peace 
of an eternity dwelling in the depths of the bay. 

Truly to appreciate the harbor is of necessity to dwell beside it. When each factor is 
analyzed, criticised, and fitted neatly into its pigeon-hole, there is the harbor like a great 
warm heart throbbing, and shaping the beat of our pulse to its own, — unaccountable, won- 
derful, and seeming more than human. It is, then, proper that my considerations should 
culminate in a bit of verse that I have sung to my harbor as a lover sings to his beloved; 
and I leave it alone in the hope that perhaps the Muse will give it grace to suggest some- 
thing more than it says : — 

MY HARBOR 

I perch beside the window pane, and rest 
My eyes upon the white-capped waters blue, 
The wandering ships and tugs of endless quest, 
And skyline spires mist-wrapped in steel-gray hue. 
Night wakes ten-thousand lights in Jersey-state, 
The Bedloe torch, the Robbin's winking eye; 
The ferries, brilliant bugs with crawling gait 
That work all night beneath a watching sky — 
Sometimes with dawn comes fog ; yet then we hear 
The hoots and toots of shipping never still : 
And often sunset paints a scarlet mere 
Beyond the Bayonne arch, and down the Kill. 

Harbor! May I with you keep fresh and free 

The fire, — the faith, of hearts who dwell by me. 

George Alfred Jones 



148 



POETRY 



POETRY [ 




DESERT 



OUR UNIVERSE 



The night wind cools the panting dunes 

The chill starlight splinters the soft skies 

The desert moon pales the stretch of ridging sand — 

To look like the bleached bones of animals. 

Mary Lewis 



The cloud ships sail across the sky, 
The stars' bright candles shine. 
The moon sends forth her gleam on high, 
The world is hers and mine. 

The beauty of the night holds sway, 
And magic rules the sphere; 
All cares and sorrows fade away; 
The infinite draws near. 



THE DESERT 

Cloudless skies and burning rays 
Beating down on dusty ways, 
Endless sands and rolling dunes, 
Phantom waters, tinkling tunes, 
Plodding camels, weary men, 
Resting now, then on again; 
Hastening now, but all in vain; 
Endless is the burning plain. 



Dorothy Look 



The dippers seek the milky way, 
The moon sails on and on, 
Till daylight breaks, the sun awakes; 
Our universe is gone. 

Dorothy Look 



TROPIC LURE 

Silken winds slipping through shaggy palm trees 

A pale south sea moon spreading a silver fire 

Sleek sand melting into frothing surf 

Flashing water lapsing rhythmically 

Nameless whispers — haunting 

Sweet music — drifting 

Call me back. 

Mary Lewis 



149 



193 3 ALPHA 



A BOUQUET 



EAGLE'S SONG 



Up and out they go, 

Slender stems; green arches 

Peopled with petals 

Golden, warm and bright, 

Sprayed with wisps of cooling fern. 

Softened with cups of amber, 

Wide ope'd buds — 

Yet — only one dips 

To kiss the rim 

Of the curved earthen bowl. 



Pauline Donovan 



Each morn I wake on a mountain high 
To see as in a dream, 
A golden sun that lights the sky 
And showers its radiant gleam. 

I know the story the West Wind tells 
When he darts through the tall straight pine, 
And the joyous song of the stream in the Fells 
As it flows in its old worn line. 

And above the snow-capped, jagged peaks 
That cut the purple clouds, 
I hunt a thousand leagues afar 
To feed three hungry mouths. 



PEN PORTRAIT 



What joy in my heart when summer is nigh- 
An old world born anew. 
Where nature green lifts her face on high 
To meet the cold fresh dew. 



When grapes ripen 
To dripping clusters 
Their cloying depths 
I find in thee. 

When petals fall 
In clouded silence 
Their poignant calm 
I find in thee. 



Pauline Donovan 



But oftentimes the skies grow black 
When the thunder roars its best 
And spearhead-flashes light the sky 
As I seek my warm deep nest. 

I am safe from the hunters and know no fear; 
My heart is light and gay; 
O'er high, bold cliffs I am lord and seer — 
Endless my land of play. 

Helen Abbott 



THE RISING MOON 



REGRET 



I saw beauty in hallowed light; 
I saw God preparing the night. 
I saw a golden speck 
Upon a weary winter sky; 
I hesitated, awed, 
Though the wind blew cold 

and night was nigh — 
And slowly, evenly, splendidly, 
The moon arose from back a cloud, 
A glorious mass of molten fire, 
Majestic, clear, and calmly proud! 



Here was Autumn gay 

and free. 
Radiant, God's ev'ry 

tree. 
I have learned these golden 

days 
Many things from printed 

page 
Yet forgot — is it not sad? — 
The festival that Autumn 

had. 



Virginia Bulger 



Virginia M. Bulger 



150 



POETRY 



IF JARS COULD SPEAK 

If jars could speak — perhaps they'd say, 

"I wonder why I'm made this way 
If I had been the Potter, tho — 
I'd make myself not quite so low." 



HOME 

Although we travel over all the world 

And see the works of nature and of man, 

And marvel at the scenes to us unfurled, 

The wondrous scenes o'er which the sky does span ; 



"I pass unnoticed, I'm so small 
Among the others, large and tall. 
If I had been the Potter, why — 
I'd made myself just twice as high." 

But— 
The master chose the smallest one 
And sagely spoke, thus — '"Tis well done- 
It is not always height or girth — 
The Potter's touch determines worth." 



And gasp astound at heights of pyramids, 
At nature's coral lacework of the sea, 
At ancient ruins, 'neath which must be hid 
The secrets of a long past century; 

We find the world in all its glory 'rayed ■ 
May not compare to charm we have at hand 
In every rock and rill, or great cascade 
We 'counter in the realm of our home land. 



The little jar was glad to say, 

"I know now, why I'm made this way- 
If I had been the Potter — how? 
I'd make myself, just as I'm now." 



For if o'er all the world we chance to roam, 
We'll find nowhere the beauty of our home. 



Gladys A. Davidian 



And if we think we're rather small — 
Just let the Potter mold the ball. 
If he makes us unlike the rest, 
Perhaps, 'tis he who knows the best ! 

Bessie T. Freitas 



WORDS 



TO — 

If all the flowers that ever grew 

Sprang up anew in the glistening dew, 

I wonder which would the fairest seem, 

And which would be touched with the first sunbeam? 

Would the sunflower rear a giant stalk 

And be the Sun of the colorful flock? 

Or would she lower her golden head 

And bow to the hollyhock, queen instead? 

Would all the violets happy seem? 

Perhaps, if the sun sent a piercing beam. 

Which scent would rise over all the rest? 

Would the roses, of all, be loveliest? 

If all the flowers that ever grew 

Sprang up anew in the glistening dew, 

I'd find the smallest "Forget-Me-Not" 

And give it to you for its simple thought. 

Virginia Ford 



Words are silver. 

They drop like ringing metal 

And echo in the air like bells — 

Ringing, chiming, 

Like bells. 

Words are music. 
They sing like courting love-birds 
And pierce the deep silence like flutes- 
Thrilling, rhyming, 
Like flutes. 

Words are fairies. 

They flit by us so airily 

And caper in the air like elves — 

Laughing, playing, 

Like elves. 



Dorothy Look 



151 



1933 ALPHA 



MEDITATION 



HE LOVES ME 



Distant music, 

Firelight, 

And faces in the flames; 

Charred coals, blackened, 

Ashes — 

That once were glowing bright; 

Faded faces, 

Dreams gone. 

Well, life is always that — 

Music, brightness, 

Darkness! — 

What then? Another dawn? 



She plucked a daisy just for fun 
And broke the petals, one by one. 

"He loves me? No; he loves me not. 
He loves me? No; he loves me not. 
Does he love me? Oh! say 'tis so." 
The final petal answered: "No". 
She paused, then said with laughing eyes, 

'Why, Daisy, Daisy, you tell lies!" 



Virginia Bulger 



Potent, 
Smoke-filled 
Messengers 
Your eyes. 



Bessie Freitas 



THE TRUTH— AS I SEE IT 

Last night I was gay. 
The sky was antique silver; 
The moon, an egret's wing. 
Last night I was gay. 

Tonight I am old. 
The sky is sheenless pewter; 
The moon, a broken ring. 
Tonight I am old. 



Full, 

Rose-blown 
Love veils 
Your lips. 

Pale, 

Moon-dipped 
Dream carriers 
Your hands. 

Magic 
All-inviting 
Creation, 
You. 



Gertrude Laird 



Verda Dunn 



152 



POETRY 



A YOUNG MODERN 

The silver moon 

Shining 

In the latticed window, 

Sending 

Lovely thready beams, 

Following 

The lines and bars, 

Spilling 

Light upon the floor, 

Weaving 

A shady pattern, 

Sending 

Exquisite invitation, 

Bringing 

The scent of new buds, 

Singing 

Tunes of shivery aspens, 

Telling -- 

I go 

And calmly pull the shade. 



Pauline Donovan 



A PICTURE 

Waves — emerald, turquoise, 

Beat upon the sand, 

Bearing high on their crests treasures of the sea. 

Spray — clear, sparkling 

Flung high in the air as the waves beat on the rocks 
Cascading back into the blue in a thousand tiny 
drops. 

Bessie T. Freitas 



IMPRESSION 

Like heat waves 
Through a blind 
The flat leaves shiver, 
Turning the light green 
Up and down. 
Turning the dark green 
Up and down. 



Pauline Donovan 



SAND DUNES 

Low dunes 
Bright with the sun 
Salt grasses bending 
Soft curving sand 
Spray soaked 
Meet the cool sea. 



Mary Lewis 



WHIMSY 

The whiteness 

Of the pond lily 
Aches 

In the darkness. 
I long to suggest, 
That the frogs 
Tip them 
Up-side-down 
— Just for the night. 



Pauline Donovan 



153 



1933 ALPHA 



FAREWELL, NORMAL OFFERING; HAIL, ALPHA 

This year we are publishing our first year book of the State Teachers College at Bridge- 
water, the Alpha. The change in name from Normal Offering, our old book, to Alpha, our' 
new, is in keeping with the change in name of our school. And so with the following re- 
print from the first Normal Offering of sixty-six years ago we say "Farewell, Normal Offer- 
ing." 

"The Normal Offering having lived through seventy-four volumes of manuscript makes 
its first appearance in print with the present issue. While we consider no apology necessary 
a brief explanation is certainly not out of place. 

"The present number is printed in accordance with a vote passed New Year's Eve, after 
reading the Offering. 

"The articles are those which were written for the Offering of the term to be read before 
the Lyceum, and not for print. Hence many things may seem meaningless to the general 
reader which are of deepest interest to the members of the Lyceum. There has been no 
time for new articles. 

"We certainly hope the number may contain something of interest to the members of 
the Senior class, the Lyceum, the graduates, the citizens of Bridgewater and teachers wher- 
ever educated. 

"Should this, our first appearance before the public, be considered a failure by any, we 
call attention to the fact that we were never elected to perform these duties. We are in- 
experienced in all such matters. School work never pressed harder, and printers demanded 
the matter in a very short time after the vote was passed. Critics, be merciful. 

"We shall be content, and feel repaid for all the hard work of the past three weeks if 
you are inclined to consider this, in any measure, a success — -The Editors." 

"HAIL, ALPHA." 



As may be gathered from the preceding reprint, it was customary in the meetings of the 
Lyceum (the literary society of the early days of the Normal School) to have read papers 
written by the members. These contributions, in the fashion of the day, were called "offer- 
ings". Hence, when one year the Lyceum decided to have these offerings printed, the name 
"Normal Offering" was given to the resulting booklet. The extract given comes from this 
first issue, a copy of which was in Dr. Boyden's possession. For some years the Normal 
Offering was printed by the Lyceum. Then it was produced for some issues by a self- 
perpetuating Board, consisting of students from the upper classes. In recent years, the 
yearbook has become truly a school project, with a Board elected by the student body. 
Alpha inherits the traditions of Normal Offering. May it continue to progress. 



154 



Autographs 



155 




156 



Ind 



ex 



Administration Building 

Alpha Board 

Autographs 

Baseball Report . 

Basketball Team 

Bennett, Jane 

Bennett, Nellie M. 

Boyden, Dr. Arthur Clarke 

Camera Club 

Campus Comment 

Choir 

Classes 

Culture Fund Committee 

Day Student Council 

Dedication . 

Dormitory Council 

Dramatic Club 

Faculty 

French Club 

Freshmen . 

Class Officers 

Class Roll . 

History 

Garden Club 

Gates House 

Glee Clubs: 

Girls' 

Men's 
Gymnasium 
Hobby Club 
Juniors 

Candidates for degree 1934 

Class Officers 

History . 

Write-ups 
K. P. Club . 
Library Club 
Literature 
Lyceum 
Memoriam to Calvin Coolidgi 
Men's Athletic Association 
Men's Club 
Normal Hall 
Orchestra 
Organizations 
Prevost, Mary A 
School Seal 
Science Club 
Scouts 
Seniors 

Class Officers 

History . 

Write-ups 
Snapshots 
Soccer Team 
Social Activities Committee 
Social Calendar 
Sophomores 

Class Officers 

Class Roll 

History . 
Spring Concert Program 
Student Council 
Topics of the Day Club 
Training School 
W. A. A. Board 
Woodward Hall 



2 

98-99 

80-155 

. 138 

135-136 

8 

9 

6-7-142 

118-119 

100-101 

. 127 

13 

88-89 

87 

5 

84-85 

102-103 

10-11 

106-107 

76-79 

76 

77-79 

. 76 

114-115 

94-95 

124-125 

128-129 

. 139 

116-117 

50-71 

69-71 

50 

. 50 

51-69 

122-123 

104-105 

141-154 

. 110 

. 138 

. 134 

. Ill 

92-93 

130-131 

97 

12 

71 

112-113 

120-121 

14-49 

14 

14 

15-49 

. 156 

. 137 

86 

. 140 

72-75 

72 

73-75 

72 

. 126 

81-83 

108-109 

. 96 

132-133 

90-91 



157 



1933 ALPHA 



giHimiilllllliimrmiiiiin jii i : : : iiin ■ i ■ i ■ : iirin : MM! ii;i;uui!i _; 

1 Compliments 

I of I 

| C.K. GROUSE COMPANY | 

NORTH ATTLEBORO 
I MASSACHUSETTS I 



Makers of the 

Bridgewater State Teachers College Rings 

and manufacturers of 

Club and Fraternity Pins 



Mt tmimmni: :;:>i:i!i:ii!iiiiii!iiiiii : :iii;i;i:,ii: v ■ i;i m\)r. 

Patronize our Advertisers 158 



AD VERTISEMENTS 



In the Long Run 



you and your friends will prize the photograph 
that looks like you — your truest self, free from stage 
effects and little conceits. 

It is in this "long run" photography that PURDY 
success has been won. 

Portraiture by camera that one cannot laugh 
or cry over in later years. 

For present pleasure and future pride protect 
your photographic self by having PURDY make the 
portraits. 



PURDY 

160 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass. 

Official Photographers, Bridgewater State 
Teachers College, Class of 1933 

Special Discount rates to all Students 

of Bridgewater State Teachers 

College 



'■ i » '"•" ' '"' jumiiiiFiriir = 

159 Patronize our Advertisers 



1933 ALPHA 



■- iiiiiirimiiii-immiiii iiiiiiimiiKiiniiiiiiini- ih.iiiuik i i iiniUMliri.L; riiniii ■_. 

The Grace M. Abbott j 

Teachers' Agency 

Grace M. Abbott, Manager 

120 Boylston Street • Boston [ 





Wright & Ditson 

Leading Athletic Outfitters in New England 

344 Washington St., Boston 
Worcester Cambridge Providence 



Money accumulated through hard work and thrift should 
have the protection provided by a Mutual Savings Bank 

ir/^ A. >ft 



Save Where You 



See This Seal 



Bridgewater Savings Bank 

| William D. Jackson, President, Harry W. Bragdon, Treasurer | 

; MM .! . .::: i u n.: i ~ 

Patronize our Advertisers 160 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



L -» ■". ■ ■ ■■•■■ ■ ■ , 



A GOOD MEAL AT A FAIR PRICE 



Special Dinners Every Day 



Oliver's American Restaurant 



Main and Broad Streets 



Bridgewater, Massachusetts 



You really feel at home when 
you eat here 

Jane-Ann Luncheonette 

M. J. Pratt A. B. Lunam 

We make what we serve 

Regular Dinners and Sandwiches of all Kinds 

BROWNIES A SPECIALTY 

Special Dinner Daily 50 cents 

49 Central Square Bridgewater 



Compliments of 

C. F. JORDAN 

Plumbing — Heating 
Hardware 

Central Square 
Bridgewater, Massachusetts 



The Rexall Drug Store 

Central Square Pharmacy 

Central Square, 2 Main St. 
Bridgewater, Mass. 

Toasted Sandwiches and Confectionery 



The Golf Shop 

86 Main Street, Room 13 

Brockton, Mass. 

Phone 7653 

Distributors of 

Reliable Athletic Equipment 



THE NORMAL STORE 

R. H. FERGUSON 

Shoes and Shoe Repairing 

Central Square Bridgewater Massachusetts 

FURNISHES THE OFFICIAL GYM SHOE 



FfillimillllllMMiiiliimiinii ■ \w > ' i iiii:ii:i.iii.Nii!i inn' inn ' : Mil inni.7 

161 Patronize our Advertisers 



1933 ALPHA 



'" 


mi' limn 


J. H. Fairbanks Co. 


Producer's 


HARDWARE 


Dairy Products 


Tennis Rackets, Red and White 

Tennis Balls, Baseballs, 

Masks, Gloves, etc. 


"Grade A" and "Family Milk" 
Heavy and Light Cream 

Local Distributor 


Central Square 
Bridgewater, Massachusetts 


Emil H. Smith 

Telephone 625 


Compliments of 


Ready for your guests 


Hayes 


at any time 


Home Bakery 


The 


Home-made Ice Cream 


Bridgewater Inn 


Bridgewater 





Brady's Diner 

Wishes good luck and success to the Graduating Class ofipjj 



The 

Mayflower 

Candy Shop 

Next to the Brockton Theater 



Standard 
Modern Printing Co. 

Incorporated 

Printers 



Brockton 



Mc- 



Tel. 751 



= ,;,>;-, 1111 < i! i , ■ ■■■■ MiMlill ': ■■■ ■■! I 1 ! 1 H-HM I ilNtlllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIJimilll JIINIIIIIIIIIIIIM7 

Patronize our Advertisers 162 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



SNOW'S FRIENDLY STORE 

We Do Appreciate Your Patronage 
Where you Bought Those 

FRESHMAN HATS 

Central Square Bridgewater, Massachusetts 

BRIDGEWATER TRUST COMPANY 

Safe Deposit Boxes and Storage 

Capital $100,000 

Surplus, Government Reserves, and Undivided Profits 

$162,000 

GOVERNMENT DEPOSITARY 

20 Central Square Bridgewater, Massachusetts 

EASTERN GRAIN CO. 

Bridgewater, Massachusetts 
Distributors of 

Wirthmore Poultry, Dairy, and Horse Feeds 

Carload Shippers of 

Grain, Milk Feed, Hay and Straw 

Mixed Cars and Transit Cars a Specialty 



21 HIGH ST. 

ARTHUR L. ATWOOD 



BROCKTON 

ADVERTISING SERVICE 



IDEAS ■ COPY • LAYOUTS ■ PRINTING • ENGRAVINGS j 

COMMERCIAL ART • PHOTOGRAPHS | 

NEWSPAPER and DIRECT MAIL | 

CAMPAIGNS | 

Supplied the Engravings used in this Book 

mi ii in i n i in ii ii i » i i " ' ■ i» ; 

163 Patronize our Advertisers 



1933 ALPHA 



-J ' '"Hi' mm in ' ■ ■ ■ '■'» Pii-iriiii.rini 



Established 1844 



C. A. Hack & Son, Inc. 

Francis P. Callahan, Pres. and Treas. 

PRINTERS 
1933 ALPHA 



42 Court St. 



Taunton, Mass. 



Telephone 660 



DO YOU ENJOY COOKING? 

Do you know that the insulation and heat control on the new ranges 
offer you a convenience and saving you would like? 



May we tell you §i|j|| about this economy ? 

BROCKTON GAS LIGHT CO. 



Costumes and Wigs 

for all occasions 

Hayden Costume Co. 

786 Washington St. 

Boston Han-4346 

Our only Boston Address 



"The Pop Shop" I 

Specialties for all occasions 

Carmel Corn . Buttered Corn 
Potato Chips • Peanuts | 

Candies and Assorted Nuts | 

Always Fresh Highest Quality Prompt Service | 



nilllimillllllll HI I MUM Ill ' ' I Hi. ,..:.! .111.111 1, III' . Ml. I. ..U.I. MM. II. MM. ,| 'Li .: . 



Patronize our Advertisers 



164